The Two-Way
2:31 am
Fri November 2, 2012

U.S. Offers New Details Of Deadly Libya Attack

A Libyan military guard stands in front of one of the U.S. Consulate's burned out buildings on Sept. 14. The U.S. is offering new details of the attack on the consulate that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.
Mohammad Hannon AP

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 10:43 am

Once a mob began attacking the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on the night of Sept. 11, officials in Washington, D.C., watched with alarm. Now, new details are emerging about their response to the deadly attack.

President Obama and his entire national security team monitored what was going on half a world away. Army Gen. Carter Ham, who was the regional commander for Africa, happened to be in Washington that day.

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Election 2012
9:22 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

McCaskill Looks To GOP Votes

Senator Claire McCaskill, flanked by 5th District Missouri Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, says she expects some Republican votes. Both are seeking re-election.
Dan Verbeck KCUR

Seeking re-election, Mo. Democratic U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill said she expects crossover support from Republicans who will vote for Mitt Romney for President and are displeased with her opponent, Todd Akin.

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Animals
7:00 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Move Over, Parrot: Elephant Mimics Trainer At Zoo

Koshi, an elephant, makes sounds that imitate Korean words.
Stoeger, et. al. Current Biology

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 10:43 am

Scientists say an Asian elephant at a South Korean zoo can imitate human speech, saying five Korean words that are readily understood by people who speak the language.

The male elephant, named Koshik, invented an unusual method of sound production that involves putting his trunk in his mouth and manipulating his vocal tract.

"This is not the kind of sound that Asian elephants normally make, and it's a dead-on match of the speech of his trainers," says Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna in Austria.

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Health
6:20 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Mayor Challenges Friend And City To Lose Weight

Jim Heeter (far right) engages in a friendly game of tug-of-war with Sly James and children at Operation Breakthrough. The two civic leaders wrapped up their health competition at the school earlier today.
Elana Gordon KCUR

A rather public weight loss competition among two prominent city leaders came to a close today, but organizers say broader efforts are just beginning.

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Central Standard Friday
6:00 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Food Critics: Comfort Food

Baked Potato Soup
Credit savourthesensesblog.com

As the weather cools off, and the hours of daylight become scarcer, our culinary musings turn to comfort food.

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It's All Politics
5:41 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

In Key Senate Races, Outside Groups Outpace Candidates' Ad Spending

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (right), D-Ohio, debates his Republican challenger, Ohio state Treasurer Josh Mandel, at the City Club in Cleveland on Oct. 15.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 6:52 pm

Most of the attention heading into Election Day may be on the presidential race, but the stakes are also high in the battle for the U.S. Senate, where there are close contests in about a dozen states.

According to an NPR analysis of Kantar Media CMAG data, outside groups are spending more than $100 million blanketing the airwaves. This won't come as a surprise if you live in a state with a competitive Senate race.

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The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Report: Non-Partisan Research Service Pulls Tax Report After GOP Complaints

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 7:36 pm

According to The New York Times, the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service pulled a report from its website after "after Senate Republicans raised concerns about the paper's findings and wording." The unit of the Library of Congress did so, despite objections from its economic team.

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Scott Tobias is the film editor of The A.V. Club, the arts and entertainment section of The Onion, where he's worked as a staff writer for over a decade. His reviews have also appeared in Time Out New York, City Pages, The Village Voice, The Nashville Scene, and The Hollywood Reporter. Along with other members of the A.V. Club staff, he co-authored the 2002 interview anthology The Tenacity Of the Cockroach and the new book Inventory, a collection of pop-culture lists.

Around the Nation
4:35 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

New Yorkers Struggle With Limited Transit Options

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 5:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

New Yorkers were ready to get back to work today. Unfortunately, the region's transportation system was not. Commuters to Manhattan overwhelmed the barely operating bus and train system. From Brooklyn, NPR's Robert Smith reports on the resulting long lines and frustration.

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It's All Politics
4:12 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Wed December 19, 2012 3:36 pm

Campaign reporters spend a lot of time pointing at color-coded electoral maps like the one below, showing which states voted for Republican John McCain (in red) and Democrat Barack Obama (in blue) in 2008.

But these maps lie — visually speaking.

Red appears to be the clear winner, dominating a vast swath from the South to the Rockies. It's all geographically accurate, but electorally skewed. For example, Montana (three electoral votes) dwarfs Massachusetts (which had 12 electoral votes in 2008).

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