Middle East
3:35 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

In A Complex Web Of Tunnels, Israel Draws Its Red Line

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 6:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mental Health
3:35 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Pa. Hospital Sees Gun Fight Between Psychiatrist And Patient

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 6:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
3:35 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

As Political Disenchantment Soars, Lines At The Polls Grow Shorter

An official assists a voter at a polling station inside Fort Garrison Elementary School in Pikesville, Md., on primary day, June 24. As in many states this primary election season, turnout was low in Maryland.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 6:40 pm

Several new surveys show voter interest is low, anti-incumbent sentiment is high, and voters from both parties are questioning whether their elected leaders should return to Congress next year.

In short, the electorate is disengaged and disgusted with politics.

Voter turnout in the 2010 primaries was only about 18 percent, and now it's even lower. Less than 15 percent of eligible citizens cast ballots in the 25 states that have held statewide primaries this year, according to a new report from the Center for the Study of the American Electorate.

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Shots - Health News
3:35 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

How Well Does A Drug Work? Look Beyond The Fine Print

Traditional warning labels on medicine boxes tend to be long on confusing language, critics say, but short on helpful numbers.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 9:47 am

Anybody who has ever seen a drug advertisement or talked over the pros and cons of a medicine with a doctor can be forgiven for being confused.

Sorting out the risks and benefits of taking a medicine can be complicated even for professionals.

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Nature
3:17 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

How Kansas City's Trees Are Saving You Money And Cutting Pollution

A new study on Kansas City's trees shows that they help save energy costs for residents and cut down pollution and carbon emissions.
Credit Cody Newill / KCUR

The tree and shrub population in the Kansas City metropolitan area saves residents nearly $14 million a year, according to a new study.

The United States Department of Agriculture's Northern Research Station (NRS) examined plant life in nine counties in the Kansas City metro area.

The NRS found that by blocking winds in the winter, shading buildings in the summer, and providing natural evaporative cooling all throughout the year, trees and shrubs significantly cut down residential energy costs.

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Men In America
2:10 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

The Average American Man Is Too Big For His Britches

Men — it's time to take a hard look at your pant size.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 3:00 pm

When my colleague Viet Le started writing about his struggle to find clothing that fits him as an "extra-small" man in a world that idolizes "big and tall," I was intrigued — and a bit confused.

Viet has never struck me as an especially small guy. At 5 feet 6 inches tall and 128 pounds, is he really that far out of the mainstream?

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

The Best And Worst Companies To Retire From

Facebook reportedly boasts impressive employee perks, but a competitive retirement plan is not among them, according to Bloomberg (Marco Paköeningrat/Flickr).

Bloomberg has ranked the best and worst companies to retire from, and some of the results are surprising: ConocoPhillips provides some of the most generous retirement benefits to employees, while Whole Foods and Facebook are ranked near the bottom.

Bloomberg’s Michael Regan joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to explain how the publication calculated the rankings.

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Market Basket Employees Protest Labor Changes

Market Basket employees protested outside of the Somerville store near Union Square on July 22. Inside, store shelves emptied this week as employees refused to deliver and stock products. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 2:56 pm

At a New England grocery store, employees are protesting labor changes — but it’s not what you’re expecting. Market Basket’s 25,000 employees don’t have a problem with their own working conditions. Rather, they want ousted CEO Arthur T. Demoulas put back in his position.

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

As Market Basket Store Shelves Empty, Online Presence Grows

The New England grocery store chain Market Basket is launching its first official website amid employee protests. (demoulasmarketbasket.com)

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 2:56 pm

It’s been a big week for Market Basket.

For a window into everything about this family-owned business that has been successful — despite deep divisions at the top — you just have to go online. From our own WBUR to Buzzfeed, countless publications are writing about the New England grocery store chain’s ongoing employee protests and resulting empty shelves.

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U.S.
1:38 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Are Opponents Of The Death Penalty Contributing To Its Problems?

A fence surrounds the state prison in Florence, Ariz., where Joseph Rudolph Wood was put to death on Wednesday. The execution process took nearly two hours.
AP

Kevin Cooper was convicted of murdering a married couple and two children, and was sentenced to die.

That was back in 1985. Cooper is still awaiting execution on California's death row.

San Bernardino County District Attorney Michael Ramos, who is handling the case, blames the long delay on Cooper's multiple appeals in state and federal courts.

"This is all a big strategic plan to really manipulate the system to attack capital punishment, not just in California, but in the United States," Ramos says.

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