Ged Carroll / Flickr-CC

When it comes to technology, there's something new every week — especially in Kansas City, where gigabit internet has fostered entrepreneurial growth and attracted tech developers from across the country.

Along with new products, businesses and ideas, are new words, phrases and jargon. And a lot of this insider language, which startup savvy people use casually, can be frustrating to someone from the outside. 

Ben Kittrell, who is a Kansas City entrepreneur and consultant, frequently acts as a technical translator for his clients.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Kansas City restaurant workers rallied in Westport Thursday afternoon to show solidarity with fast-food employees in New York, where a wage board has voted to increase the minimum wage to $15.

“I think everyone should know that for a better economy, better neighborhoods, everyone should be paid well,” says Terrence Wise, who works more than 60 hours a week at McDonald’s and Burger King. “If workers in general have more money, then they have more money to spend and boost the economy.”

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The grass was still damp from overnight rains in Washington Square Park Tuesday morning as sculptor Will Vannerson stepped away from a section of the galvanized sculptural work called "Moon Garden."

After Vannerson lifted the work from the bed of a pickup truck, he said wanted to get a broader view of the large, silvery tubes in the context of the park’s landscape.

Chris Murphy / Flickr-CC

There’s a first time for everything, right? Like your first kiss. Or your first job. Or your first kiss on the job – hold it now!

What things can you experience for the first time this weekend? There are some brand new events, familiar entertainers in fresh contexts and popular attractions that you may have overlooked or even avoided for some silly reason.

Mike Foster
Julie Denesha / / KCUR

Some innovators develop something completely new. Others take something that everyone thought was working fine and make it better.

Alex Smith / Heartland Health Monitor

Early hearing loss was hard for Rob Jefferson to accept, even though it runs in his family.

“No, it couldn’t have been me,” he says. “It wasn’t my hearing. Everybody was mumbling.”

The 56-year-old resident of Belton, Missouri, started losing his hearing when he was 17 years old, the result of premature degeneration of the hair cells in his inner ear.

By the time he reached his mid-30s, everyday communication had become difficult, and Jefferson gradually retreated from social activities.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The Federal Transit Administration has given first-round approval to a big overhaul of Kansas City's Prospect Avenue bus line.

The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority has been working for several years to turn the route into a MAX line like the Main Street and Troost Avenue routes.

The Transit Administration's approval means the project can now move into its development phase, and the KCATA can start trying to secure federal funding to help offset the estimated $54 million price tag.

The number of Kansans maintaining health coverage through, the federal online marketplace, has declined since spring.

As of the end of June, 84,872 Kansans were enrolled in Affordable Care Act policies, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. That’s down 0.7 percent from the nearly 85,490 enrolled at the end of March but higher than the 57,000 enrolled in the spring of 2014.

In Missouri, enrollment decreased to 212,256 in June from 219,953 in March, a decline of 3.5 percent.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

  Who murdered Paula Beverly Davis?

This week, KCUR looked at a case that began as a missing person in 1987, only to be discovered 22 years later as a homicide.

Davis’ two sisters, Stephanie Clack and Alice Beverly, found her as an identified person, Englewood Jane Doe, in the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, or NamUs, in 2009.  We told that story on Tuesday. (The story is here.)

courtesy Kansas City Irish Center

The luck of the Irish was with two arts organizations this past weekend at the 13th annual Kansas City Irish Fest at Crown Center.

The Irish Center of Kansas City kicked off a $3.5 million capital campaign for a new home. Festival officials matched on-site donations with a check for $125,000 for the non-profit, which has been housed in the lower level of Union Station since 2007. Also at the festival, a new company, Irish Repertory Theatre, announced its inaugural season. 

A decision to accredit so-called mid-level dental providers by a national agency that oversees dental education programs may boost efforts to license them in Kansas.

The Commission on Dental Accreditation says that without national accreditation standards for mid-level dental providers — also known as dental therapists — the requirements would vary from state to state.

Burns & McDonnell

Greg Graves, the chairman and chief executive of engineering and architecture firm Burns & McDonnell, has been elected the new chair of The University of Kansas Hospital Authority Board.

Graves, who was vice chair of the authority board and leads the hospital’s fund raising drive for its new patient tower, succeeds Bob Honse, the former president of Farmland Industries.

The hospital authority is the public overseer of The University of Kansas Hospital and its operations.

Kansas City police are investigating a shooting that took the lives of three people Tuesday night in south Kansas City, one of them an infant. This is the fourth deadly shooting in the city in the past week.

African American students have greater faith in the fairness of their schools when they have more black teachers. That’s a finding in a new national study conducted by professors from the University of Kansas and the University of Missouri.

The study examined student attitudes towards discipline and fairness by analyzing survey data of 10th graders around the country from the National Center for Education Statistics at the U.S. Department of Education.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

New test scores released Tuesday show only a quarter of Kansas 10th graders have the math skills needed to be ready for college or a career after graduation. Around a third of 10th graders were shown to have English skills that place them on the college track.

The goal of the new tests is to better judge if students will be ready for college or a job after high school. Board of Education Chairman Jim McNiece says this year's scores may not be as high as some people had hoped, but board members chose to set high goals for the state's students.

Jillisa Washington

The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services is reviewing a waiting list for developmental disability services after counties reported discrepancies between how many residents they have waiting and how many are on the state’s list.

There are more than 3,000 Kansans with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) on the KDADS waiting list for Medicaid-covered support services meant to allow them to remain in their homes and communities rather than live in institutions.


A study to be published in an upcoming issue of JAMA Pediatrics is the first to find a causal link between young people using e-cigarettes and then moving on to tobacco products.

The study, funded by the National Cancer Institute, followed a national sample of 700 16- to 26-year-old non-smokers. When first surveyed, all of them said they did not think they would smoke a traditional cigarette within the next year, even if offered one by a friend.

Kyle Palmer / KCUR

Mike Besler is a former Kansas state high school champion quarterback and a member of the Blue Valley West High School Hall of Fame. But he still needs a coach. 

"When I first heard, I was kind of like, 'I want my own space.' But now that I've seen how resourceful it is, it's made a world of difference," Besler says. 

The Missouri Supreme Court is scheduled to announce some decisions Tuesday and one of them might involve the Kansas City Chiefs.

Steve Cox, a former maintenance manager at Arrowhead Stadium, is suing the Chiefs for age discrimination. The Missouri Supreme Court will decide on whether key evidence from the plaintiff’s side will be admissible.

“Any time that there’s a legal matter that you’re involved in you’re always concerned,” said Chiefs chairman Clark Hunt last week. “I don’t specifically have concern over that issue though.”

The two Kansas City Royals players who came down with the chicken pox have rejoined their teammates.

Alex Rios and Kelvin Herrera made their first appearance at Kauffman Stadium since they were diagnosed a week earlier in Tampa.

They were cleared by the team’s doctors on Sunday and Royals manager Ned Yost had the option to use them.

“The outbreak wasn’t severe enough in terms of their bodies with a bunch of the little chicken pox things they have,” Rios didn’t play in last night’s game, but Yost used Kelvin Herrera in relief against Minnesota.

Jeff Tigchelaar
Certain Streets at an Uncertain Hour (Woodley Press, 2015)

Writing free verse is playing tennis with the net down, Robert Frost famously said, and yet in the decades since his dismissal of the form many poets have ventured to win that game. Frost also once wrote to a friend that irony is a kind of guardedness, that at bottom the world isn’t a joke and humor is the most engaging cowardice — dour, almost dictatorial pronouncements.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

This is the second of a two-part series. For part one of this story, click here.

Some 28 years after the murder of her sister, Stephanie Clack has her cold case close at hand, in a large cardboard box she carries in her car.

“This is how serious I am,” she said, pulling out reports and photos and old newspaper clippings about the disappearance of her oldest sister.

Courtesy of Stephanie Clack

When Alan Meade made police detective in Englewood, Ohio, in 2003, he inherited the department’s only unidentified person case.

“Englewood Jane Doe,” named after the small suburb of Dayton, was a 20-something white woman, wearing only blue jeans and a bandanna, found by two passers-by on Aug. 10, 1987. She was strangled and dumped down a hill near an off-ramp to Interstate 70

Courtesy photo / Kansas State University

Critics say the Kansas State University marching band put a Kansas Jayhawk in a compromised position during halftime of the Wildcats' season opener Saturday. (Decide for yourself here.)

The band performed a 'space'-themed show and at one point began playing music from Star Trek. One half of the band formed what looked like a Jayhawk; the other half formed what any Trekkie would recognize as the Starship Enterprise. Then, the two formations started coming towards each other, causing the uproar.

Salvation Army USA West / Flickr-CC

The Salvation Army's Olathe food pantry is facing a severe food shortage due to rising demand.

Since 2012, demand for food has climbed 72 percent at the Olathe location. Officials say that it could be because of a sharp rise in poverty levels in Johnson County, Kansas since 2000. 

alamosbasement / Flickr--CC

Parents and teachers in Kansas may be in for a shock when new standardized test scores are released.

The Kansas State Board of Education will meet Tuesday in Topeka to review the results.

After that, statewide results on math and English are expected to be released and then districts will start to send letters to parents on how their students performed.

Department of Education Deputy Commissioner Brad Neuenswander says because the tests were more difficult, parents should not be shocked with relatively low scores.

Laura Spencer / KCUR

William Trowbridge is Missouri’s third poet laureate. He was appointed to a two-year term, and that was three years ago. But, he says, he continues to serve because he hasn’t been told to stop — yet.

When Trowbridge first took on the role, he was asked to write a poem about Missouri. He didn’t want to write a typical “I love my state poem,” so he came up with something else: "Unofficial Missouri Poem."

It doesn’t pay to mess with nuns.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association seems to think Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Health System (SCL Health) is infringing its trademark.

The faith-based health provider has used the cross symbol to denote its Christian heritage for decades.

Since 1976, its trademark has consisted of a heart superimposed on a cross. In 2014, it updated the logo to include a splash of blue and duly filed an application with the Patent and Trademark Office.

Mike Mozart / Wikimedia Commons--CC

Applebee’s is leaving the Kansas City area after bouncing around the region for decades, collecting tax incentives.   

Applebee’s parent company DineEquity announced Friday that it’s moving executive functions for the Kansas City based restaurant chain to California.

Kyle Palmer / KCUR

What’s not to love about fried chicken? There’s the crispy, crackling exterior and a juicy interior. It’s portable and best eaten with your hands, making it the perfect picnic fare — especially for this holiday weekend.

It can be served hot or cold, and don’t forget the sides: Mashed potatoes, green beans, pasta salad, fresh corn and tomatoes, biscuits and so much more (cinnamon rolls, anyone?).

“It’s the ultimate comfort food,” Food Critic Charles Ferruzza told Gina Kaufmann on Central Standard.

And don’t worry the health factor, despite what Ferruzza says —“It’s a guilty pleasure because you should feel guilty eating it!”

On Friday’s Central Standard, chef Derek Nacey from Blvd Tavern told us about his Korean fried chicken dish, then the Food Critics searched out the best fried chicken in and around Kansas City — here's what they came up with.