urban design http://kcur.org en Kansas City's Front Porches Are Gathering Places, And Now Music Venues, Too http://kcur.org/post/kansas-citys-front-porches-are-gathering-places-and-now-music-venues-too <p>The front porch is an American institution. It's an ideal place to wind down with a cool drink on a summer night. But this familiar scene is all-too-easy to take for granted.</p><p>On the occasion of Kansas City's inaugural PorchFest, a music festival bringing 70 bands to residential porches, <em>Central Standard</em> takes a look at the history of the American front porch. We also visit with the festival organizer to hear about the bands bringing West Plaza porches to life this weekend.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p> Thu, 12 Jun 2014 15:26:30 +0000 Gina Kaufmann, Matthew Long-Middleton & Matt Hodapp 57278 at http://kcur.org Kansas City's Front Porches Are Gathering Places, And Now Music Venues, Too Does Our City Bring Strangers Together, Or Keep Them Apart? http://kcur.org/post/does-our-city-bring-strangers-together-or-keep-them-apart <p>A <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/26/opinion/sunday/hello-stranger.html?_r=0">recent article</a> in the <em>New York Times</em> compiled a growing body of evidence suggesting that the more frequent our interactions with strangers, the happier we tend to be. The findings apply to introverts and extroverts alike. In response to the enthusiasm around that article, <em>Central Standard</em> asked whether the people of Kansas City encounter strangers often enough in their day-to-day lives. Does Kansas City's built environment facilitate or prohibit these kinds of interactions?</p> Wed, 14 May 2014 17:25:13 +0000 Gina Kaufmann, Matthew Long-Middleton & Sylvia Maria Gross 55717 at http://kcur.org Does Our City Bring Strangers Together, Or Keep Them Apart? Shopping Mall Closures And What They Mean For Our Cityscape http://kcur.org/post/shopping-mall-closures-and-what-they-mean-our-cityscape <p>Shopping malls across the city and across the nation are closing their doors or re-imagining their futures. With the recent closure of Metro North and a meeting called to gather community input on redevelopment possibilities for Metcalf South, <em>Central Standard</em> convened local experts to look back on the significance of the shopping mall, in our city and in our lives.&nbsp;</p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 20:23:48 +0000 Gina Kaufmann, Matthew Long-Middleton, Christie Garton, Kate Baxendale & Suzanne Hogan 54633 at http://kcur.org Shopping Mall Closures And What They Mean For Our Cityscape The History Of Troost http://kcur.org/post/history-troost <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">For decades, </span>Troost<span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;Avenue has symbolized racial separation, income disparity and vast differences in home value as well as frequency of crime. But it's only a street. And at one time, it happened to be quite a prosperous street.</span></p><p>Hosted by Monroe Dodd, this discussion explores the specific decisions, both national and local, that laid the groundwork for Troost's transformation into a major metropolitan divide. Personal stories from a longtime resident contribute to this conversation. &nbsp;</p> Fri, 11 Apr 2014 20:49:56 +0000 Gina Kaufmann & Matthew Long-Middleton 54072 at http://kcur.org Urbanized http://kcur.org/post/urbanized <p>Over half the world’s population now lives in an urban area, and 75 percent will call a city home by 2050. But while some cities are growing, others are shrinking. The challenges of balancing housing, mobility, public space, civic engagement, economic development, and environmental policy are quickly becoming universal concerns.</p> <p>So, who is allowed to shape these urban spaces, and how do they do it?</p> Mon, 09 Apr 2012 02:53:08 +0000 Steve Kraske, Stephen Steigman & Kathleen Pointer 15654 at http://kcur.org Urbanized