Food And Drink

Gabriel Saldana / Flickr - CC

The great thing about the Thanksgiving feast is that the table is groaning with wonderful comfort foods and lots and lots of leftovers.

The less appealing thing about Thanksgiving is that 48 hours after the holiday, you’re sick of cold turkey sandwiches and re-heated mashed potatoes and you’re ready for something else to eat. 

On Friday’s Central Standard, Charles Ferruzza and fellow food critics, Emily Farris, Mary Bloch and Chris Becicka shared ideas for a post-holiday culinary detox, and took calls with listener suggestions. Below are their suggestions.

Charles Haynes / Flickr - CC

A rich, flavorful broth with hardy vegetables can go a long way to raising your spirits. And a hearty soup like a stew or a bowl of Vietnamese pho can actually serve as a meal. In the Depression, home cooks discovered starting a meal with soup took the edge off of hunger so they could serve a more modest entrée. But no matter how you serve soup, it ranks as one of the best dishes ever for surviving cold weather, providing comfortable relief for the common cold, and eating your vegetables.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Not yet 9 a.m. on a warm fall day, freshmen Binh Hua and My Nguyen are in protective goggles, long hair pulled back, ready for their chemistry class in a Garden City Community College lab.

The teacher calls the class to order, calling the students “Busters,” short for “Broncbusters,” the college’s mascot and a reminder of this old West town’s history of raising cattle.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Sister Janice Thome’s office is a 2003 brown Ford Focus with a backseat piled high with paperwork and a prayer book.

Thome puts 125,000 miles a year on this car, picking up boxes from the food pantry, finding a mattress for a newcomer, delivering a sick soul to a doctor’s appointment. All the while, she fields emergency calls on her flip phone, responding to her mission to serve the poor of Garden City, out on the plains of southwest Kansas.

This day, Thome is teaching her teen parenting class at the alternative high school.

Abbie Fentress Swanson / Harvest Public Media

It’s almost 9 a.m., and Noel Primary School teacher Erin McPherson is helping a group of Spanish-speaking students complete English language exercises. But it’s tough going.

One student in a bright blue T-shirt – 9-year-old Isac Martinez – has not yet picked up his pencil. He’s clearly sick. When McPherson asks him what’s wrong, Isac’s small voice is barely audible in between coughs. He says he threw up four times last night but did not go to a doctor.

A proposed rule change that would have eliminated food stamp eligibility for about 58,000 Missourians has been withdrawn by Gov. Jay Nixon.

The governor had sought to cut eligibility for unemployed adults without children, citing concerns over the amount of federal funds available for state-run food assistance programs. 

Fellow Democrat and State Senator Jamilah Nasheed of St. Louis says she’s elated by the governor’s reversal.

clementine gallot / Flickr

An official with the Missouri Department of Social Services (DSS) briefed a House Interim Committee Monday on Governor Jay Nixon's proposed rule change to cut able-bodied adults without children from the federal food stamp program (SNAP) if they don't have a job. 

Allison Campbell with the DSS Family Support Division says they initially sought to implement the change on October 1st via emergency rule, but she admits that approach was a mistake.

Food Critics: Diabetic Dining

Oct 18, 2013
cookbookman17 / Flickr - CC

Most of us are very lucky. When we go out to eat, we usually don’t worry about dietary restrictions or fret over missing the delicious food we'd like to eat.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

When a new disease — known as PEDV —turned up in the U.S. hog industry in May and threatened to kill whole litters of piglets, the National Pork Board quickly responded with $450,000 in research funding.

A fast-track review process put funds in U.S. labs in two weeks, said Paul Sundberg, the board’s vice president for science and technology. Normally, it takes months for the board’s volunteer committees to decide research priorities.

Franklin B Thompson / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Lawrence, Kan. is probably best-known to most of us as the home of the University of Kansas, but the beloved college town has also become a dining destination for Kansas City diners. Just 45 minutes outside of the heart of Kansas City, Lawrence boasts one of the best bakeries in the Midwest and at least a half dozen truly excellent restaurants. Charles Ferruzza and fellow food critics Mary Bloch, Emily Farris, and Sara Shepherd  give you a crash course in Lawrence dining. Notebooks ready? 

New and Notable

Food Critics: African Cuisine

Sep 20, 2013
Wikimedia Commons - CC

Over a decade ago, the National Restaurant Association issued a report stating that Italian, Mexican and Chinese cuisines had become so popular, they had moved beyond the ethnic food category and into the mainstream. But less familiar culinary traditions are making an increasingly greater impact on how we eat in America. In Kansas City, for example, there are more opportunities to sample the cuisine of the African continent than ever before, and that's just what Charles Ferruzza and fellow food critics Mary Bloch, Chris Becicka, and Emily Farris will do.

Food Critics: Restaurant Trends

Sep 6, 2013
Pace J Miller / Creative Commons

When you dine out you may have noticed that certain trends have been popping up lately. We're seeing noisier dining rooms, smaller portions, and desserts almost as expensive as the entrees. And whatever happened to salad bars, anyway?

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

As Midwest vineyards move in next door to longstanding fields of corn or soybeans, they don’t always make good neighbors. Occasionally, herbicides like 2,4-D drift beyond their target, and for nearby vineyards the results can be devastating.

2,4-D is a common herbicide used by farmers because it kills weeds but doesn’t kill their corn. Landscapers and golf courses use it on lawns and fairways. Highway crews often spray 2,4-D on road ditches.

Fast Food Wage Protest Aims To Gain KC Momentum

Aug 29, 2013
Dan Verbeck / KCUR

More than a hundred people striking fast food chains brought their second one-day action in a month to   Kansas City area locations.

The demands were higher pay and right to unionize without retaliation.

They carried signs but did not picket three locations and it was more a protest rally than formal strike.

AMERICANVIRUS / Flickr -- Creative Commons

You get home, you're dog tired, and the thought of looking for ingredients, digging through your fridge and combining them into a meal is just too much to bare. So you pick up a phone, but who you gonna call?

Charles Ferruzza and the food critics search for the best places that will deliver their meals right to your doorstep or allow you to simply take them directly from their kitchen.

Delivery:

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Tyson Foods, Inc., announced this week that it would soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is not about cattle, but rather the battle for sales in other countries, where using drugs for meat production is banned.

“I really do think this is more a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners,” said Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

Patrick Hoesly / Flikr - CC

For many years, Kansas City’s primary restaurant spots were downtown and the Country Club Plaza. But times have changed. And over the last 30 years, the destinations for good eating have expanded to include most of the outlying suburban cities – from Prairie Village to Lee’s Summit and Liberty to Martin City. Kansas City diners can hop in the car and travel anywhere in the metro to find unexpected culinary treasures.

Derek Oyen, Olle Svensson, La Grande Farmers' Market, Alice Henneman, Liz West, Tea With Buzz, Justus Blumer, Wee Keat Chin, Dan, Richard North, Dmansouri, Wally Hartshorn/Flickr-CC

"Organic" has been the buzzword in produce for years, but not everyone has the budget to buy only fruit and vegetables with that certification.

Jacob McCleland / Harvest Public Media

As a child, Robert Harris Jr. worked the cotton fields of southeastern Missouri’s bootheel. Like many sharecroppers’ children, he fled that life. Now, four decades later, the harvest is calling him again, this time to grow food for the needy in a bunch of community gardens in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

I met with Robert in a garden just outside a food pantry that distributes his produce. We poked through the lush patch of vegetables, full of plump yellow squash and green cucumbers. Soft-spoken and humble, Harris said he had a connection to plants from an early age.

Dan Verbeck / KCUR

Some Kansas City fast food workers walked off the job July 29 in a seven city effort to hike the minimum wage to $15 and guarantee right to organize unions.   

Some 150 people marched in front of the Burger King at 47th and Troost. Democratic Missouri Congressman Emanuel Cleaver joined in strike-support and argued for a higher minimum wage.  

"There is no empirical evidence to suggest all of the claims that we see by those who fight against the minimum wage," said Cleaver.

Talking Tannins: Summer Wine

Jul 19, 2013
Gavin Wray/Flickr-CC

Summertime in Kansas City can be sweltering, but a good glass of chilled wine can be just the thing to cool off. 

Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

With summer produce in full bloom, Café Sebastienne's Jennifer Maloney shares some summer dishes from the restaurant's kitchen.

Chilled Cantaloupe and Basil Soup

Serve this cool favorite with a dry Riesling wine.

Not So Traditonal Fourth Of July Dishes

Jul 3, 2013
AlejandroLinaresGarcia / Wikimedia--CC

Aunt Mary Helen's Chicken and Mole

  • Chicken - whole or rotisserie
  • Vegetable oil - 2 teaspoons
  • Finely chopped onion - 1/4 cup
  • Mexican chocolate - shaved 4-5 tablespoons
  • Can of tomatoes - blended (or can of tomatoe soup)
  • Ground cumin - 1 teaspoon
  • Dried cilantro - 1 teaspoon
  • Dried mine garlic - 1/8 teaspoon
  • 1 (4 once) can of diced green chile peppers

Chicken preparation:

  1. Boil chicken
  2. Take skin off 
  3. Shred chicken

Mole sauce preparation:

Molecular mixology is a scientific approach to preparing cocktails that uses alcohol in unique ways.

These mixologists use chemistry to create cocktails with different tastes, textures and phases of matter. Arielle Johnson, a Ph.D candidate at UC Davis and a Flavor Chemist at Nordic Food Lab along with author Kevin Liu explained the science behind molecular mixology. And for those not as fluent in chemistry as Johnson and Liu, Scott Tipton of the Kill Devil Club in Kansas City created some drinks in studio to explain to the common bar goer. 

Food For The Fourth

Jul 2, 2013
technikhil-CC

There are many traditions associated with the Fourth of July: parades, fireworks and food. Just as America is a melting pot of its people, so are the picnics and barbeques we sit down to as we mark our nation’s birth.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Within the local food movement, the community supported agriculture model is praised. CSAs, as they’re commonly known, are often considered one of the best ways to restore a connection to the foods we eat.

The model is simple: Consumers buy a share of a farmer’s produce up front as a shareholder and then reap the rewards at harvest time. But running a CSA can bring with it some tricky business decisions.

Popular food writer Mark Bittman took the pulpit at the Unity Temple in Kansas City Thursday night, preaching his gospel of progressive food policy and offering denunciations of what he calls “Big Food.”

Beautiful Lily/Flickr--CC

The U.S. House is set to take up the farm bill this week, after the Senate passed its version of the bill in early June. Both bills include about $500 billion in spending over five years. Few pieces of legislation can produce such sharp divisions, even by Washington standards—but few could have such immediate, significant impact on so many Americans.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

If you’ve experienced sticker shock shopping for ground beef or steak recently, be prepared for an entire summer of high beef prices.

Multi-year droughts in states that produce most of the country’s beef cattle have driven up costs to historic highs. Last year, ranchers culled deep into their herds – some even liquidated all their cattle – which pushed the U.S. cattle herd to its lowest point since the 1950s.

Dry conditions this summer could cause the herd to dwindle even further. That means beef prices may continue on a steady climb, just in time for grilling season.

Hinnerk R / WikiCommons

Food is a social activity, and where there are people entertainment follows.  On the Friday, June 14 the Central Standard food critics explore the best places to dine while catching a song, a game of trivia and more. 

Here is a list of some of the restaurants talked about on the show:

The New Places

The Red Door Grill - 11851 Roe Ave, Camelot Court Shopping Center, Leawood, KS 66211

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