Health

Up to Date
12:00 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Parents, Teens & Divorce

Divorce can be painful for everyone. Dr. Wes Crenshaw joins Steve Kraske to talk about what parents can do to make it less hurtful for teens.
Credit Free Grunge Textures/Flickr-CC

Divorce presents difficult situations for any family, but it can be especially disruptive to teenagers. Just how much it affects them depends on how parents shape the situation.

On Monday's Up to Date, psychologist Wes Crenshaw joins us with a few teen guests to talk about what it’s like to be caught in the middle, what parents can do to make the transition easier and what factors mark the difference between a clean break and a chaotic split.

Guests:

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Health
8:06 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Kansas WIC Checks In Jeopardy Due To Federal Shutdown

If the federal government shutdown continues longer than two more weeks, 70,000 young mothers, babies and preschoolers in Kansas stand to lose access to some of the food they rely on.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has ordered local WIC offices to withhold checks for November and December until federal funding is assured. WIC checks are normally issued for three months at a time. 

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Central Standard
4:51 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

What Is Sex Addiction?

Credit Lynda Sanchez / Flickr - CC

Now more than ever, our society seems preoccupied with sex. Sexting and twerking are a part of our lexicon. Whether we’re talking about television, popular music or movies, sexual images and innuendo are everywhere. And access to pornography is as easy as a click of a mouse for the over 40 million people who log into porn websites. Given the highly sexualized society we live in, can a person really become addicted to sex? And at what point does sex become an unhealthy addiction—a bad habit that interferes with work, relationships and mental health?

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Health
1:54 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

West Nile Virus On the Rise In Kansas

Kansas health officials say the number of residents infected with West Nile virus is on the rise. There have been 32 cases so far this year.

Twelve new cases were reported last week, according to KDHE spokeswoman Aimee Rosenow.

"Cases are most common in late summer and early fall months, and until we have that first really hard freeze, you know, mosquitoes are still out there," says Rosenow. "So it’s really important for Kansans to take precautions against mosquito bites."

Central Standard
11:37 am
Wed October 9, 2013

E-Cigarettes

Credit Leondardrodiguez / Flickr -- Creative Commons

E cigarettes are growing in popularity - a billion dollar industry- a product that is being used all around the world. Yet there is still a lot that we still know about the long term health effects of E cigarettes, which are being advertised in magazines and television, and come in flavors like vanilla, cherry, pina colada and more. As the FDA is still deciding how to regulate e cigarettes, we discuss what we know and don’t know about the product. How effective are e cigarettes in reducing regular cigarette use, are they safe? In this fiery discussion Dr.

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Central Standard
10:05 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Obsessive hand washing is one of the typical symptoms of OCD.
Credit SCA Svenska Cellulsa Aktiebolaget / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Obsessive thoughts can lead to obsessive behaviors. According to psychologist Dr. Bruce Liese, obsessive compulsives typically have a recurring, persistent and unwanted thought or thoughts that won't go away. These thoughts tend to be irrational and very closely correlated with anxiety and can often cause anxiety themselves.

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Health
9:29 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Obamacare Sign-up Starts, But Questions Linger

The wait for one of the biggest pieces of Obamacare is over. Starting Tuesday, Americans who don't have access to affordable health insurance through their employers can shop for coverage in new online marketplaces, also known as exchanges. The Kansas Insurance Department has been holding meetings across the state to answer questions about the exchange.

Linda Sheppard is the Kansas Insurance Department’s Director of Health Care Policy. She says the state is ready as it can be.

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Health
5:24 am
Tue October 1, 2013

National Budget Battle Threatens Medical Research

Robyn and Maddie Major at AACR Cancer Progress Report, in Washington, D.C.
Credit courtesy of AACR

Maddie Major shouldn’t be alive today. The eight-year-old girl has been fighting a form of leukemia since she was three. Robyn Major, Maddie’s mother, says in spite of chemotherapy, radiation, and even a bone  marrow transplant, Maddie’s cancer kept coming back. 

“In August of 2012, she relapsed for the second time,” says Robyn Major. "It was at that time that we realized conventional therapies weren’t going to offer a cure for Maddie.”

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KC Currents
12:16 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Answering Questions On Kan. And Mo.'s New Health Insurance Marketplaces

Credit Creative Commons

Whether or not you agree with the Affordable Care Act politically, you might be wondering what your health insurance options will be under this new law, particularly if you don't get insurance from your employer.

Jessica Hembree, program officer at the Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City, and Sandy Praeger, Kansas insurance commissioner, join us to answer questions about the new health insurance marketplaces in Kansas and Missouri. 

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Health
8:45 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Kansas Hospitals Making Progress On Infections

The first-ever statewide report on infections in Kansas hospitals shows progress against two specific types of infections.

According to the CDC, Americans contract 1.7 million infections every year while being treated in hospitals and 99,000 people die from these infections, adding $30 billion to the nation’s healthcare costs. 

Joey Scaletta directs the Kansas healthcare-associated infections program. He says approximately five of every 100 patients admitted to a hospital contract an infection while there.

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Health
7:43 am
Fri September 27, 2013

KU Med Gets $3 Million To Study The Effect Of Exercise On Alzheimer’s

Study volunteer Joe Gittemeier and KU Med neurology professor Jeffrey Burns.
Credit Alex Smith / KCUR

With help from a new grant, University of Kansas Medical Center researchers will look at how Alzheimer's might be prevented without drugs. Pharmaceutical companies haven’t had much success fighting the disease, which is the most common form of dementia.

KU Med Dr. Jeff Burns will have older high risk volunteers in the study exercise 150 minutes a week. Burns will scan volunteers’ brains to see how exercise affects amyloid protein, which is linked to the disease.

Burns says even if exercise can only hold off Alzheimer’s, it could make a big difference.

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KC Currents
9:42 am
Thu September 26, 2013

Health Marketplaces Open Soon, But Supporters In Mo. Face Hurdles

Credit 401(k) 2012 / Flickr--Creative Commons

In recent weeks, states like Colorado, California and Oregon have been hit hard by advertising campaigns designed to let people know about their state-created health marketplaces. State health marketplaces are a central part of the Affordable Care Act, but information about Missouri’s health marketplace has been hard to find. And that’s not just because the state decided not to set one up.

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Central Standard
1:09 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

The Growing Populations Of Bed Bugs And Lice

Credit Michael Aulia / Flickr - CC

‘Good night, sleep tight, don't let the bed bugs bite.’  It’s a phrase you’ve probably heard a lot, but perhaps holds a different significance to you if you’ve had a bed bug infestation or know someone who has.  Cases of bed bugs have been rising in recent years. But just who or what are these vermin?  They feed on human blood, don’t contract diseases,  and can be hard to talk about. Perhaps more importantly, how do we get rid of them?

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Health
9:35 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Study Says Kansas City Hospital Prices 'Unusually High'

A new study shows that the prices private insurers pay to hospitals vary widely. Not only that, they're much higher than what Medicare pays — especially in Kansas City.

The study, done by the non-profit Center for Studying Health System Change, reviewed actual claims paid for more than $500,000 auto workers and their families in 13 Midwestern metropolitan areas.

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Up to Date
12:00 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

Parents, Teens & Sexual Development

Psychologist Wes Crenshaw joins us to discuss how sexual material teens find online affects their development.
Credit Jessica Zee/ Flickr-CC

When it comes to pornography, the days of sneaking a peek at a Playboy at the drugstore have faded. The internet seems to have everything, and that’s especially true when you’re talking about porn.

On Monday's Up to Date, psychologist Wes Crenshaw joins us to discuss how the availability and increasing explicit nature of pornography is affect sexual development in teens. We discuss why the impact of pornography is different today and how parents can approach the topic with their teens.

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Health
7:56 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Group Seeks To Increase Kan. Nursing Home Requirements

A nursing home watchdog group says Kansas nursing home residents would benefit from increased requirements for direct care from nurses and nurse-aides in nursing homes. Current regulations require adequate staffing to provide each resident a minimum of two hours of direct care daily.

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Up to Date
4:00 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Analyzing The Texting And Driving Problem

KU professor Paul Atchley studies distracted drivers.
Credit Jason Weaver/ Flickr-CC

We all know that texting while driving often results in accidents, and a New Jersey court recently ruled that it's not only the driver who's responsible-- if you know someone's driving when you send a text, you might be held responsible if he or she gets into an accident.

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Central Standard
5:00 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

The Negative Consequences Of Procrastination

Credit scottfeldstein / Flickr - CC

Human beings have always been pain-avoiding creatures. We seek to avoid the things we don't like or that could bring pain to us, and we pursue the things that bring us pleasure and happiness. Oftentimes, this human practice takes form in procrastination.

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Health
12:59 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

E-Cigarette Use Among Kids Doubles In One Year

A nationwide survey of kids in grades six through twelve shows that nearly 1.8 million of them have tried electronic cigarettes, more than double the rate reported the previous year.

The CDC says nearly seven percent of middle and high school students have tried e-cigarettes, and more than two percent are current users. Erika Sward of the American Lung Association says the rapid growth is due in large part to an aggressive marketing campaign.

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Up to Date
11:47 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Hall Family Foundation $75 Million Pledge: Passion For Cause...Or Bribe?

A 4-story institute for translational medicine building would be built on top of an existing parking structure at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City - if Jackson County voters approve a 1/2 cent sales tax increase in November.
Credit Children's Mercy Hospital

On Wednesday, the Hall Family Foundation announced that it was pledging $75 million to Children's Mercy Hospital for build a translational medicine research building on Children's Mercy's campus on Hospital Hill.

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Health
10:30 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Hall Family Foundation To Give $75M To Children's Mercy, Maybe

Children's Mercy Hospital would receive $75 million from the Hall Family Foundation if Jackson County voters approve a half-cent sales tax for medical research.
Wikipedia Commons

The Hall Family Foundation is pledging $75 million to build a research building at Children’s Mercy Hospital, but only if Jackson County voters pass a half-cent medical research sales tax. 

At the hospital Wednesday, foundation president Bill Hall said the tax offers Kansas City a big opportunity.

"We recognize it is asking a great deal of the voters of Jackson County," he said. "However, we believe this is a moment we must seize. The tax is transformational."

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KC Currents
1:06 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

KC Group Fights Breast-Feeding Disparities With Education, Support

Sherry Payne, Executive Director of Uzazi Village, aims to address infant and maternal health inequalities, especially in Kansas City's African-American community. She has been a nurse for 12 years and is studying to become a midwife.
Credit Monica Sandreczki / KCUR

It’s widely accepted that breast-feeding is the best way to feed an infant. But in some communities, breast-feeding has fallen out of favor. Nationally, only about 60 percent of African-American women attempt to nurse their babies. And many of them stop within the first three months. But breast-fed babies are less likely to die of SIDS or develop asthma and obesity later in life — health issues that occur most often in African-Americans. In Kansas City, Mo.

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Health
10:00 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Study: Predictions Of Health Care 'Rate Shock' Are Unfounded

A new study from a non-profit research group says predictions of huge premium increases when the Affordable Care Act goes into effect in January are unfounded. 

Kansas is one of 10 states the Rand Corporation studied in detail. The study predicts that by 2016, only 6.6 percent of Kansans too young for Medicare will be uninsured. Without the new law, that figure would be more than 14 percent. 

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Central Standard
10:19 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Suicide And The Digital Afterlife

Credit Valentin Casarsa / istockphoto - CC

Whenever a loved one dies, those left behind suffer for that loss, but when that loved one chose to take his or her own life, how do friends and family recover?  In 2009 deaths from suicide surpassed those in motor vehicle accidents. There were more than 30,000 that year.  And in a society that lives much of its life online through social media, what happens to one’s digital self after suicide? Is it acceptable to “defriend the dead,” or is social media a good way for us to cope with the loss of our loved ones?

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Up to Date
4:08 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Area Health Institutions Attempt Translational Medicine Center

Kansas City's Children's Mercy Hospital would be one of a number of Jackson County institutions to benefit from proceeds from a 1/2-cent sales tax for translational medicine.
Credit Wikipedia Commons

The Jackson County Legislature voted Monday to place a 20-year, half-cent sales tax measure on the November 5 ballot.

Aimed at boosting economic development and funding research, supporters call it a game-changer for Kansas City, a way to bolster the area's claim as a hub of life science research. Opponents haven't galvanized, at least in a visible way. But lots of questions are being raised.

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Health
9:18 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Infant Mortality Up Slightly In Kansas Last Year

A new research brief by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment shows a slight increase in the infant mortality rate last year.

Infant mortality refers to babies who die before their first birthday. Although the trend has been downward, Kansas has exceeded the national infant mortality rate every year since 2003. 

KDHE Secretary Robert Moser says last year’s rate was 6.3 deaths per thousand live births.

“That’s relatively low, but unfortunately it’s up slightly from 2011,” says Moser.

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Up to Date
12:00 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Preschoolers & Gunplay: What's Normal?

On Monday's Up to Date, we explore how much gunplay is normal for children.
Credit Kamal Zharif Kamaludin/Flickr-CC

Playing cops and robbers is just part of normal childhood, right? Should we be more concerned about what children learn through these games?

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Health
8:30 am
Thu August 22, 2013

'Superglue Baby' Healthy, Developing Normally

Ashlyn Julian in the arms of KU Brain Surgeon Koji Ebersole.
Courtesy of Jill Chadwick KU Hospital

A three-month-old Kansas City-area baby shows no sign of problems following a first-of-its-kind surgical procedure a little more than two months ago at the University of Kansas Hospital. 

Ashlyn Julian was diagnosed with a brain aneurysm when she was just three weeks old.  A weak spot in one of her brain’s blood vessels had ruptured. 

Traditional brain surgery might have proven fatal at Julian’s age. So KU brain surgeon Koji Ebersole maneuvered a tiny catheter through blood vessel to deliver a drop of superglue.  It immediately stopped the bleeding. 

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Health
7:29 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Rural Residents Stand To Benefit More From Affordable Care Act

A new report by the Center for Rural Affairs finds that rural residents stand to benefit from the Affordable Care Act more than their city-dwelling counterparts.

The report’s author, Jon Bailey, says the premium tax credits to help pay for individual health insurance plans, and the caps on out-of-pocket costs will be especially important to people who live in rural areas.

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Health
6:25 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Obesity Still A Big Concern In Kansas, Missouri

A new report on obesity in America says Kansas is now the 14th most obese state in the nation.  Missouri ranked just one spot below at 15th. 

The annual “F as in Fat” report says 29.9 percent of adults in Kansas are obese and 29.6 percent in Missouri. That’s barely changed from last year. 

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