EPA

Roy Inman

For all the reasons one thinks of a small town in America — a small, blue-collar community where people leave their doors unlocked and kids play ball in the streets — Picher, Oklahoma was a fantastic place to grow up.

Ed Keheley remembers the closeness of his community.

“The adults in the community basically policed all the kids. You were afraid to do something, if anyone saw it they would immediately call your parents,” Keheley told Steve Kraske on KCUR’s Up To Date.  

Picher, Oklahoma rode the wave of lead and zinc mining in the region that began in the late 19th Century. By 1980 it was an EPA Superfund site and by the 2010 Census, fewer than 20 persons were counted as residents. We look at how Picher is remembered through former residents and through the lens of a local artist.

Guests:

Andy Marso / Heartland Health Monitor

Republican legislators who control energy-related House and Senate committees want to halt work on a plan to comply with federal climate change regulations now that the U.S. Supreme Court has put a temporary stay on the requirements.

But some of their colleagues say it would be prudent to keep preparing the plan in case the court ultimately rules against the state. And environmentalists say the state should move to reduce carbon emissions regardless of federal law.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

The amount of ethanol blended into the U.S. fuel supply will go up under new rules issued Monday.

In releasing the details of the Renewable Fuel Standard, the policy that sets the amount of biofuels oil refiners must blend into the fuel supply, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to continue to increase the proportion renewable fuels, most of which is comprised of corn ethanol.

Matt Hodapp / KCUR

Democrat Missouri Rep. Joe Runions from District 037 provides an insider perspective on the Missouri General Assembly as we discuss local control, Ferguson, and gridlock in Jefferson City.

Guests:

  • Joe Runions, Rep. from District 037, Missouri General Assembly 
  • Tricia Bushnell, Citizen
  • Dave Hudnall, Staff Writer, The Pitch
Alex Smith / KCUR

Environmental Protection Agency officials announced Wednesday morning a $475,000 grant to help clean up and redevelop neglected property in Kansas City.

Mathy Stanislaus, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, spoke at the site of the former Horace Mann school, where affordable senior housing is now being constructed with the help of EPA funding.

Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

The Clean Power Plan recently announced by President Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency is designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants by almost one-third over the next 15 years. Tucked into the plan’s thousands of pages is language that makes it unlikely that a new coal-fired power plant will ever be built in southwest Kansas.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Fresh off a win in one multi-state lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced he will join another.

Schmidt’s office said Tuesday morning he was joining attorneys general from eight other states in fighting the “Waters of the U.S.” rule intended to expand the scope of the Clean Water Act to smaller tributaries.

For the first time, the byproducts of coal-fired power plants will now be subject to federal regulation.

In a state like Missouri, which generates more than 80 percent of its electricity from coal, the new standards could have significant repercussions.

       

Three measures seeking to rein in the Environmental Protection Agency passed the U.S. House of Representatives last week along largely partisan lines, with all of the Republicans in the Missouri and Kansas delegations voting in favor of the bills and the two Missouri Democrats voting against them.

commons.wikipedia.org

 

An official with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment said it will be difficult for the state to have a plan in place by the proposed deadline to meet President Obama's order to curb emissions linked to climate change.

Tom Gross, chief of the bureau's air monitoring and planning division, said the rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency could leave the state with only one year between the time it becomes final in June 2015 and the time the state has to implement a plan in June 2016.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency is touring farm country, trying to assure farmers that the agency isn’t asking for more authority over farmers and ranchers’ lands.

The EPA has awarded $1.2 million for projects in a 15-county area of northeast Kansas and northwest Missouri. The money will be used to redevelop underused or abandoned properties, and to train residents and help them land environmental jobs.

The grants are being administered by the Mo-Kan Regional Council. 

A revolving loan fund will of $1 million will help revitalize blighted sites that may contain hazardous waste or petroleum contamination. Executive Director Tom Bliss says there are nearly 400 eligible properties in the 15-county area.

Alfred Palmer / Wikimedia Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency just released its plan to reduce carbon pollution from power plants and that idea is generating some heat of its own. On Thursday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske and a panel examine what the EPA standards mean for Missouri and Kansas. Both states rely heavily on coal-powered energy and face the challenge of meeting the emission cuts in the time allowed.  We’ll also look at whether alternatives like wind and solar will be catapulted to the front of the line in area energy production.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the first-ever rules to cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. The proposal sparked immediate debate over the impact, especially in states such as Missouri that depend heavily on coal.

The new regulations would reduce carbon pollution from the power sector by 30 percent nationwide by 2030, compared to 2005 emissions levels.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The recently confirmed Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency was in Kansas City, Mo. Wednesday to present a federal grant to the Black Health Care Coalition.

McCarthy said the agency was one of 39 applicants to receive an Environmental Justice Small Grant Award from the EPA. She said the process was competitive, saying there were hundreds of proposals.

The grant offers $30,000 for one year to educate teachers and health care professionals about the onset and treatment of childhood asthma.

Clean air, you’d think it would be a no brainer, but it took an act of Congress to make it a law. There are 20 coal power plants in Missouri, and they expose over 4.7 million people within a 30 mile radius, to their exhaust. In Kansas there are eight coal power plants.

It’s been almost 50 years since the Clean Air Act was made into law, and the way the public views clean air has radically changed from then to now. Stephen Steigman hosts this discussion on the changing culture of environmental protection.

Guests:

The Environmental Protection Agency is looking for input on how to cut carbon emissions from the nation's power plants, but they're doing it in a different way this time around. They're looking for ideas from the public during 11 hearings nationwide, including a hearing Monday in Lenexa, Kan.  

Normally, the EPA would research the issue, develop some proposed rules and then take public comments on the proposals. But this time, they’re first looking for ideas from the public, the industry and stakeholders for ways to reduce carbon emissions from power plants.

The two Kansas Cities have won a $600,000 federal grant from the Environmental  Protection Agency to restore a score or more environmentally blighted areas. 

The project to be called One-KC Brownfields Coalition will include hazard cleanup, urban farms, orchards and gardens.

The properties are in a swath across state line. They lie in the central city of Kansas City Kansas and roughly bordered by  the Missouri River and 31st in Kansas City, Mo. 

The Superfund National Priorities List now includes nine new sites-one of them where a smelter used to operate on the east side of Iola.

The EPA says the soil on hundreds of residential and commercial properties in and around Iola is contaminated with lead, arsenic, cadmium and zinc. EPA Region 7 spokeswoman Dianna Whitaker says the biggest concern is lead.

“Children can get into that lead—especially young children," she says. "They put their hands in their mouths, and then they can be exposed and absorb lead, and lead is very dangerous for young children."

Dan Verbeck / KCUR

Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says every aspect explored proves the wisdom of moving the Agency’s regional headquarters to Lenexa, Kansas.

Food Is UMKC Focus On America Recycles Day

Nov 15, 2012
Dan Verbeck / KCUR

The Region Seven Administrator of the  Environmental  Protection Agency holds up University of Missouri-Kansas City’s food recovery and  dining  recycling programs as examples to emulate.

Soil Cleanup Underway In Southwest Missouri

Oct 5, 2012
wikimedia commons

When the tornado tore through Joplin and Duquesne in southwest Mo. in May 2011, not only did it kill 161 people and destroy thousands of buildings, it also unearthed something dangerous:

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

The Environmental Protection Agencies’ Regional Headquarter Offices in downtown Kansas City, Kansas will officially be relocating to a new location this fall.  Their new home?  The former Applebee’s headquarters in Lenexa, Kansas. 

  • Missing Student Found, Not Abducted
  • KC Mayor Pushes For Control Of Schools
  • Benedictine Student Dies In Wintry Mix
  • EPA Sets New Standards For  Power Plants

Road Builders Accused of Polluting

Sep 2, 2010

Kansas City, KS – The Environmental Protection Agency accuses MoDOT of failing to protect streams along two highway construction jobs. Inspectors allegedly found sediment was allowed to seep into a half dozen creeks and unnamed tributaries in Camden and Wayne Counties in central Missouri.

The waterways flow into Lake of the Ozarks.

Rich Hill, Mo. – March is typically when the outdoor planting season starts for Amish and Mennonite farmers in Missouri. But this year, many of these farmers may be exploring ways to farm using more environmentally-conscious methods. KCUR's Alex Smith reports.

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