Bruce Liese

Good criticism can make all the difference, but that doesn't make it fun to hear. It can also be tough to deliver, even when it's intended in a loving spirit. Self-examination, careful listening and sensitive timing can go a long way, when both giving and receiving input.

Guest:

  • Bruce Liese, psychologist and professor of family medicine, The University of Kansas Medical Center

There's a silence in the conversation. Does your hand start inching involuntarily toward your phone? The speed and easy access of communication technology has changed the way we relate: to each other, our surroundings, ourselves, and our time. But as we communicate more quickly and more often, are the bonds we forge any stronger?

Guest:

An emotional reaction begins with a set of reflexive messages originating in the brain. It happens faster than thought and is beyond our control. But what we do with that emotion and how long we hold onto it beyond the initial reflex? That's another story.

Guest:

public domain / Wikimedia Commons

Aristotle said, "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit." 

But making excellence a habit is easier said than done. For most people, the word habit evokes thoughts of junk food or television, not excellence.

Psychologist Bruce Liese stopped by Central Standard to talk about the ins and outs of habit formation, and help us recognize the difference between a good habit and a bad one. He offered advice on getting to the root causes of our most deeply ingrained patterns and offered insight into the common problem of relapse. 

Graduation Anxiety

May 5, 2014
Dave Herholz / Flickr/CC

    

Spring is the season of change. Many high school seniors are preparing to leave the familiar to experience the independence that comes with university life. College seniors are expected to go out into the "real world" and take on new responsibilities. On today's Central Standard, psychologist Bruce Liese guides both students and parents through the uncertainties of this transitional period.

Guest:

Brent Weichsel / Creative Commons

We eat every day and most of us enjoy it. It satiates our hunger, and provides us with nutrition and complex and pleasurable flavors and textures. But for some people eating can become the center of an obsession, an inescapable part of the date filled with anxiety. Eating disorders impact 2.7 percent of population, according the National Institute of Mental Health, but the problem extends far beyond the struggling individual.

Aveda Corporation / Flickr - CC

Thousands of us make New Year's resolutions. When the clock marks the start of a new year, it's also a new opportunity for self-improvement. However, many of these resolutions will fall into the trap of being more about the "self" part rather than the "improvement" part.

On Monday's Central Standard, host Bill Anderson and psychologist Bruce Liese observe aspects of vanity and help tweak your New Year's resolutions so they are less about physical appearance and more about giving back to family, friends and community.

Time management is a constant struggle in many of our lives, so how do we take time to find that inner calm within us?

Host Bill Anderson talks with Bruce Liese about learning to live in the moment even while tackling a demanding schedule.

Guest:

  • Bruce Liese, Professor of Family Medicine at KU Medical Center

  

Wikimedia Commons - CC

Narcissism is a word that gets thrown around a lot these days. It's often a self-diagnosed condition, or people refer to others as narcissistic when they are merely being selfish.

Today on Central Standard, Host Bill Anderson talks with Dr. Bruce Liese, Professor of Family Medicine at the KU Medical Center, about the destructive behaviors that make relationships difficult. We'll also explore  arrogance, and the ways in which you can cope with a narcissist at home or at work.

Chris Samuel / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Right now our government is mining data about your conversations--who you called, when you called them, how long you talked, and who you’ve emailed. It’s all technically approved by law, but for many it’s deeply unsettling.

On this Central Standard we take a step backward and inward from the controversy surrounding domestic surveillance and look at the psychology of secrets and privacy with psychologist Bruce Liese.

Flickr/canonsnapper

According to the CDC 1 in 10 adults report being depressed and 11% of Americans over 12 years old take some form of antidepressant medication.  Depression –is a mental disorder that is more severe than just sad feelings.  It can last long periods of time, include feelings of hopelessness and uselessness. Cause chronic pain, headaches, sleeping and eating disorders, and thoughts of suicide.  Depression makes day to day life seem pointless or impossible to handle.

Dr. Bruce Liese, a psychologist at KU Medical Center, explores the various elements of depression from diagnosis to treatment through to recovery.

Competition

Apr 1, 2013

It has been quite a week for one of the biggest sports competitions of the year. And just as march madness comes to a end the Kansas City Royals, kick off their season opener in Chicago.

In honor of these events we’ll be taking a look at the psychology of competition. It permeates not just sports, but almost every aspect of our lives as we compete for money, prestige and more.  But, when is it healthy and when does it become detrimental not just to our personal, but social wellbeing?  And how do we tell the difference?

  When surveyed, 20 to 25 percent of people admit to having an extramarital affair.  It also is one of the most destructive forces to a  relationship.  Why is this phenomena so common? Our resident psychologist Bruce Liese tackles the common misconceptions about affairs.


Today on Central Standard, we talk about conflict, and resolving it. Why is it that our workplaces, our families, even the international community have such trouble getting along? Our resident psychologist Bruce Liese is here to try to help … and to give us some ideas about conflict resolution in our world and in our lives.

Addiction

Dec 2, 2012
Miles Cave / flickr

The holidays are a time to gather with friends and family in cheer.  The holidays also are a time of high stress and anxiety which can lead to addictive behaviors.


Lonely In KC

Nov 26, 2012

Ever wonder what it would be like to live in Kansas City and not know anyone?

Why Do We Dream?

Sep 24, 2012
flickr / zaiko.monster

On Monday’s Central Standard, a look into dreams with psychologist Dr. Bruce Liese.

We’ll learn about the history of dream research and analysis. Plus, we’ll explore lucid dreaming, or dreaming when you know you’re dreaming.

GUEST:
Dr. Bruce Liese, KU Family Medicine

Why Do We Work?

Sep 12, 2012

On Wednesday’s Central Standard, special guest host Brian Ellison talks with psychologist Dr. Bruce Liese about the meaning of work.

Why do we work? Are we searching for more than a job, more than a paycheck? How does one find their “calling?” Plus, we’ll discuss the role that the modern-day office job plays in the development of personal relationships.

Death & Dying

Aug 27, 2012
bendingself / flickr

I know it’s a beautiful summer day outside, and you’re busy thinking of a million things you have planned for the coming week, but sometimes, we have to step outside the day to day for a deeper discussion about what it means to be human, to be alive.

The Secret Lives Of Secrets

Aug 3, 2012
g00dapple / flickr

On this Monday's Central Standard, a look at the psychological implications of the secrets we keep. Are all secrets created equal?

On Being Mindful

Jun 29, 2012
Tantek / Flickr

On this Monday's Central Standard, the one thing you’ll need to get everything you want out of life: mindfulness. Learn how cutting back on multitasking, and learning how to focus your mind, can change everything.

What Your Story Says About You

Jun 4, 2012
Aptmetaphor / flickr

You know the phrase "that’s my story and I’m sticking to it?" Don’t! On this Monday's Central Standard, learn how changing the way you tell your story can help free you from your past.

Who Are You Really?

May 4, 2012
paurian / flickr

Are you who you say you are? Do other people see you that way? Can you be one person at home and another person at work? Is that ideal?

Happiness Is An Inside Job

Apr 9, 2012
shoot head / flickr

What’s the key to happiness? Is it money? Status? Your own lake house with jet skis?

Ego & Self-Esteem

Mar 5, 2012
thezartorialist / flickr

On this Central Standard, we get to know a hungry ghost with a gigantic tummy: your ego.

The Psychology Of Eating

Feb 20, 2012
celeste343 / flickr

On this Central Standard, we explore what happens to our brains on food. Have you ever wondered what goes on when you lie in bed, thinking about that late night snack?

Misbehaving In The Workplace

Jan 9, 2012
flickr/o5com

Cliques, harassment, inappropriate jokes... It's no wonder getting up to go to work can be work.

On Monday's Central Standard: a discussion about conflict and misbehavior on the job with Dr. Bruce Liese.

The Psychology of Giving

Dec 19, 2011

Today on Central Standard, we ask - what's the greatest gift you've ever received? What do you like about giving gifts in the first place? Dr. Bruce Liese joins us for a look at the psychology behind giving.

Parenting

Dec 5, 2011
Flickr/Daquella manera

Can you ever love your child too much? Today on the show, join Dr. Bruce Liese for a look at what happens when parents are too attuned to their children, and how our culture’s obsession with happiness can lead our children towards an unhappy adulthood.

GUEST:
Dr. Bruce Liese, University of Kansas School of Medicine 

Emotional Intelligence

Oct 3, 2011

In the era of Facebook and Twitter – one TMI update or insensitive comment could have lasting consequences. Join Dr. Bruce Liese and guest host Bill Anderson today for a look at a kind of intelligence that has nothing to do with your IQ, but everything to do with success in your relationships and career – your emotional intelligence.

Luckily even if you aren't in tune with your emotional intelligence, you can learn to adapt. Dr. Liese says:

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