Arts & Culture

KCUR’s Arts & Culture Desk covers arts news from music to visual art to dance and theater, with a focus on Kansas and Missouri.

Our reporters explore the behind-the-scene stories about newsmakers and emerging artists. We also take a look at the intersections of arts and technology, science and creativity, and present profiles of creative people. 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

A visit to a KCK restaurant that doesn't see geography as a barrier to serving fresh seafood, then we hear about an Oak Grove farm that's raising shrimp.

Plus, KCUR's Food Critics search out the best seafood in and around KC.

Guests:

Clarke Wyatt

Musicians Betse Ellis and Clarke Wyatt started playing as Betse & Clarke, a fiddle and banjo duo, in late 2014. Their latest album is called River Still Rise.

A look at what's going on at this week's TechWeek conference in KC. Plus, an encore interview with the CEO of KC-based EyeVerify, which just sold for a lot of money (reportedly $100 million) to Alibaba.

Guests:

Patrick Emerson / Flickr--CC

We can’t all be triumphant at once – unless we share our victories.

That’s the ticket this weekend, when winning talents and other successful allures invite each and every one of us to beat back defeat and exult in glorious achievement.

How’s that for a triumphant attitude? Feel free to pass it on!

1. Cyndi Lauper

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

This story first appeared on KCUR's Question Quest. You can find the episode here or wherever you download podcasts.

Zach Bauman

The Anniversary, a band from Lawrence, earned national recognition before it broke up in 2004, but the band has reunited for a national tour that concludes in their hometown on Saturday.

3 reasons we're listening to The Anniversary this week:

Colleges are attracting more students than ever before. And when they get there from rural or urban settings, from diverse backgrounds, they have to figure out — some for the first time — how to deal with difference.

Guests:

In the inaugural episode of Question Quest, co-host Cody Newill dives into the past to find out about a decrepit underground tunnel in Kansas City, Missouri, that's been long abandoned and is very hard to get into.

Rich the Factor
Smile and Whale Mafi (Major Factor Records)

In the parlance of the street, the Kansas City rapper Rich the Factor has spent most of the past two years on “vacation.”

Since his extended incarceration recently ended, the man born Richard Johnson has been making up for lost time. “I’m fresh up out the pen and I’m back with a vengeance,” he raps on “Blow the Horn,” a combative track on one of his two new albums.

It's this season's most compelling made-for-TV drama: The 2016 election. From costumes to stage sets to the use of music and more, we explore the role of political theater. How do candidates present themselves on stage and screen for drama ... or comedy?

Guests:

C.J. Janovy / KCUR 89.3

Out in Western Kansas, not too far from Dodge City, is the town of Jetmore. It’s home to about 900 people, including the Bradshaw family. Young Crystal Bradshaw had a happy childhood there, but one thing was missing, so she set out to solve a family mystery.

She ended up writing an important book about Kansas – before she even went to college.

Jeremy Bernfield / KCUR 89.3

Try stopping a sneeze. You can’t.

So it goes with similarly inevitable stuff happening this weekend, including the Chiefs’ 2016 season-opener, area visual artists making their annual pilgrimage to Westport and the never-ending return of Frank, Dean and Sammy.  

Don’t sneeze or you might miss out. Oh, that’s right, you can’t help but … ah-choo!

1. Kansas City Chiefs vs. San Diego Chargers

courtesy Helix Architecture and Design, Inc.

Updated: On Thursday, the Kansas City Council approved $7 million in funding for the University of Missouri-Kansas City's downtown campus for the arts. This brings the fundraising total to $48 million, and UMKC will be eligible to seek matching state funds for the $96 million project. 

courtesy: Exhibitions International

Staff from Kansas City's Union Station announced Wednesday that come November the Bank of America Gallery will be the first stop on a three-city North American tour of POMPEII: The Exhibition. 

Exhibitions International president John Norman said visitors to POMPEII will take a journey back in time to the ancient Roman city "where they will learn about Pompeii, and the bustling, commercial port that it was." 

3 Reasons We're Listening To Dan Thomas This Week

Sep 7, 2016
Courtesy Dan Thomas

Jazz saxophonist Dan Thomas opens for Marilyn Maye this weekend.

Thomas is the associate director of Jazz Studies at the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance. He's also the bandleader of Voyage, whose other members are pianist Wayne Hawkins, bassist Forest Stewart and drummer Mike Warren (no relation to the KCUR contributor of the same name).

Courtesy Amy Greene Vines

Two cars cruise into Kansas City. In one, a man and woman battling poverty and bad luck try to outrun their past. The other is a battered old Jeep Wrangler, in which two estranged sisters attempt to reconnect after a wedding catastrophe.

The stories seem as different as can be but share a key factor: They are the first two feature films to be shot in Kansas City after the establishment of the Film and Media rebate incentive.

Courtesy Sharon Rodriguez

As election season cranks into post-Labor Day fury, the Johnson County Library wants to provoke conversations about democracy and activism.

It's doing so with events titled Bear Witness, kicking off on Thursday with an art opening intended to “bear witness to the events and issues of the past and present, and to postulate those in the future.”

One literal witness is photographer Sharon Rodriguez, who has spent the past year interviewing and taking photographs of homeless people in Johnson County.

Courtesy David George

David George & A Crooked Mile
Radiant Man (Uniglobe Records)

In a week or so, David George & A Crooked Mile’s music will be all over town.

Sergio Jordá Gregori / Flickr -- CC

Whether it’s served as a side or as the base of a dish — or even sweetened for breakfast or dessert — rice is part of many beloved dishes around the world.

“From a Midwestern perspective, a lot of it is used as a filler,” Food Critic Jenny Vergara told guest host Brian Ellison on KCUR’s Central Standard.

“I think what makes a hero rice dish stand out is something that absolutely makes rice the centerpiece,” she added.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Each month on First Fridays, thousands of visitors stroll through galleries in the Crossroads Arts District. On the industrial northeast corner of the district, Tom Deatherage curates an eclectic mix of edgy, local art in his red, two-story The Late Show Gallery.

Deatherage, who lives in the apartment upstairs, says he’s always been drawn to artists and their work. And after more than 25 years of dealing in art, he says he knows what he likes.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

More than 20 years ago, in 1994, philanthropist Muriel McBrien Kauffman started talking about a vision for a performing arts center in Kansas City. After years of planning, selecting architect Moshe Safdie, fundraising, and finally building —the $326 million Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts opened to the public in September 2011. 

Ed Webster / Flickr - CC

Without imagination there would be no Picasso, no pyramids, no pantaloons – don’t ask me where I came up with that last example. Oh, that’s right, my imagination.

In any case, folks with enough faith in their minds’ eyes look to have the most fun this Labor Day holiday weekend, with offerings that include professional (as in pretend) wrestling, the ethereal promise of the spirit world and the area’s annual trip back to the 16th-century.

Don’t forget to wear your pantaloons!

1. Pops in the Park

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City theater audiences know Damron Russel Armstrong’s work – he’s been an actor and director in town for years. But Armstrong’s new role is his most challenging yet: He’s starting a new theater company.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Eddie Delahunt is Kansas City’s favorite Irish troubadour, and it's Irish Fest weekend in Kansas City. That's enough reason to spotlight Delahunt, but we'll get a bit more specific.

3 reasons we're listening to Eddie Delahunt this week:

1. Delahunt moved to the United States from his native Ireland in 1989. He’s been a mainstay of Kansas City’s music community for more than 20 years.

courtesy: Paul Andrews

Mesner Puppet Theater announced leadership changes to the organization Tuesday.

Founder Paul Mesner will be handing over the reins as artistic director to longtime puppeteer and associate artistic director Mike Horner. The company has also created the new position of Education Director, and artist, set designer and director Alex Espy will be taking on that role. 

KCUR 89.3

It was a rainy night in April in Lawrence, Kansas. 

Liberty Hall was hosting the twelfth stop on Jónsi Birgisson’s solo live experience tour of 2010. During Sigur Ros’ indefinite hiatus, lead singer Birgisson set out to craft an experience all his own.

Courtesy Eddie Moore

Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle
Kings & Queens (Ropeadope Records)

Eddie Moore is diligently pulling Kansas City’s jazz scene into the 21st century. Since moving here from Houston in 2010, the 30-year-old keyboardist has done as much as any jazz-oriented musician to bring Kansas City up to date.

Charlie Parker was born on Aug. 29, 1920. For three years now, Kansas City jazz organizations have marked his birthday week with a Charlie Parker Celebration, trying to increase hometown appreciation for the influential jazz saxophonist.

Paul Andrews / http://paulandrewsphotography.com/

For Mark Bedell, school was a safe haven.

“It gave me an opportunity to be a kid because I had to be an adult a lot sooner than most kids should have to be an adult,” he told guest host Brian Ellison on Central Standard.

Courtesy Two Tone Press

Color is an essential part of the lives of sisters Angie and Michelle Dreher, who run Two Tone Press, a letterpress print shop in midtown Kansas City, Missouri.

But after watching a short video on Facebook, lack of color recognition grabbed their attention.

"It's like, maybe, a 2-minute video. But I was like crying," says Angie Dreher, who watched the video as people tried on EnChroma glasses. They're designed to boost and improve color vision for those who are color blind. 

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