Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is a daily radio show that explores what really matters to the people in the Kansas City area. We tell the stories of our city and region from the bottom up and through the perspective of individuals. We are an inclusive forum that explores art, ideas and how the news affects lives and communities.

Coming up the week of May 2, 2016:

  • Monday: Weekends
  • Tuesday: Grandmothers Mural / Institutional Betrayal
  • Wednesday: Migration And Storytelling / Itinerant Plein Air Painters
  • Thursday: Mosquitoes / Pow Wow Leader
  • Friday:  Portrait Session: Krystle Warren
Jen Chen / KCUR 89.3

We chat with a local musician, whose genre has been described as "avant-garde folk" and "guitar-and-growl." Plus, a live, in-studio performance.

Guest:

Walker Evans / Public Domain/Documentary Portraits of Mississippi: The Thirties, Selected and Edited by Patti Carr Black

In this encore presentation of Central Standard: Kansas City is known as the "Crossroads of America" for its major interstates and sizable rail network. What is it like to hitchhike here? Plus, a discussion on the best — and not-so-great — bathrooms in town.

Guests:

University of Texas Press

Mary J. Blige has been called the Queen of Hip-Hop Soul, but what fans love most isn't her status as pop culture royalty, but her vulnerability and honesty, especially with her own struggles. What is it about this artist that accounts for her staying power, since 1992?

Guests:

KOMU News / Flickr

Why do some graduating high school students, in 2016, consider historically black colleges or universities (HBCUs) over PWI (predominantly white institutions)? Hear how these schools struggle to match the resources of their competitors, and why they continue to have a distinct appeal for many students nonetheless.

Guests:

A graduating high school senior without US citizenship reflects on her journey so far. With several college options to choose from, how does this accomplished student's immigration status influence the decision about where to go?

Guest:

Krokstrom Klubb & Market / Facebook

It's starting to warm up, and Kansas City's food scene is changing.

KCUR’s Food Critics — Charles Ferruzza, Bonjwing Lee and Pete Dulin — have been watching what’s going on. They shared their news with host Gina Kaufmann on Friday’s Central Standard.

Bob Wasabi Kitchen / Facebook

When KCUR Food Critic Charles Ferruzza moved to Kansas City in 1984, there were “lots and lots” of Chinese restaurants, but very few Thai, Korean or Vietnamese places.

That has changed.

“People have no idea what a plethora of options they have now,” he told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR’s Central Standard.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

We visit a Filipino restaurant in Grain Valley, and we hear more about a French-Korean bakery that set up shop in Overland Park. Then, our Food Critics search out the best Asian food in and around KC.

Guests:

Luka Mjeda

After a new curator took over the The Krapina Neanderthal Museum in Croatia, David Frayer, a professor emeritus at the University of Kansas, was contacted to examine a previously overlooked collection of eight eagle talons that led him to a sudden epiphany.

Mike Licht/Flickr -- CC

We explore how technology has changed our relationships with our homes ... and society.

Guests:

As we're in the midst of another election season, we hear a lot about how each candidate seems "presidential." What does that word mean, and what does it say about us? An editor who publishes books about the presidency shares his thoughts.

Guest:

A KU professor, who studies how lizards branch into various species, has come to some pretty big conclusions on what defines a species.

Guest:

Jessica Spengler / Flickr

The food of Kansas City has a life story to tell. Author Andrea Broomfield tells it. The origins of Kansas City chili, tamales and tailgating, an affinity for dining al fresco and cinnamon rolls, and what local beer has to do with our sports teams and stadiums. Every food tradition can be explained through the lens of history.

Guest:

Men In Uniform

Mar 28, 2016

According to Pellom McDaniels, when African-Americans served in World War I donning uniforms, the experience empowered them, not just as Americans but as men. On the homefront, they relived that dignity in their baseball careers. 

Guest:

A Kansas City-based filmmaker talks short films, mothers-in-law and wanting to knock an obnoxious guy's chair over at a picnic. Her most recent short film, I Was a Teenage Girl, Apparently, is making its local premiere

Guest:

  • Lynn Elliot, filmmaker 

It's an animated Disney film about the first rabbit on the police force. But it also addresses issues of politics, race, gender, stereotyping and xenophobia. We hear how the politics of Zootopia mirror Kansas City, and how the first Latina columnist for The Kansas City Star relates to that bunny cop.

Guests:

How a KU professor and his students are using Google Earth to track the destruction of archaeological sites in Syria.

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Sequoia Maner grew up just miles from Compton, and she first heard rapper Kendrick Lamar’s mix tapes on local L.A. radio. Now she uses his art in class to probe race and radicalism. We hear her story and explore Lamar's work.

Maner will be the keynote speaker tonight at KU's Reflections on Kendrick Lamar.

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Recently, a controversy erupted in the Independence School District about the use of isolation rooms. How do teachers and administrators approach behavioral issues in the classroom? From grabbing the paddle to sparing the rod, to some new techniques, we explore how ideas about discipline in schools are changing.

Guests:

As the presidential primary continues and voters in both Kansas and Missouri await the general election, we visit with one demographic that doesn't always get a say: the teen demographic. 

Guests:

  • Suan Sonna, sophomore, Sumner Academy
  • Olivia Crabtree, senior, Archibishop O'Hara High School
  • Claire Gibbs, senior, Shawnee Mission East
DonkeyHotey / Flickr

Politics happen along party lines, and we mean that in more ways than one. Kansas Citians on the art of political fundraising. Specifically, the local fundraising parties that fill the coffers of national candidates.

Guests:

  • Sharon Hoffman, organizer for a variety of causes and candidates, including Obama's 2008 and 2012 Kansas City campaigns
  • Annie Presley, principle, McKellar Group

The quiet force behind the Kansas City Art Institute's Department of Ceramics describes falling in love with clay and finding inspiration in Kansas City's architecture (in part by riding a bike around town and breaking into abandoned buildings when she was an undergrad herself). 

Guest:

  • Cary Esser, chair, Department of Ceramics, The Kansas City Art Institute

Being scared doesn't make my list of top five emotions. It's not even in the top 20. I actively dislike both roller coasters and horror movies. (In fact, a Donald Duck fire safety video I saw when I was 4 scared me enough that I can still recall scenes from the movie, vividly.) And though I'm not Polyannaish in my reading taste, I'm not a thrill seeker, either. Live radio supplies me with plenty of adrenaline.

So it's saying a lot that the weekend before Kansas author Cote Smith came on Central Standard to talk about the anxiety-laced world he created in his new novel Hurt People, I found myself glued to my seat for hours, heart thumping along to the words on the page.

courtesy Kansas City Art Institute

Cary Esser, longtime chair of the ceramics department at the Kansas City Art Institute, credits a high school classmate in the 1970s for her introduction to ceramics. 

As Esser recalls, her best friend, Julie, was taking a class, and "truthfully, I didn't know what ceramics was." 

Esser visited the basement classroom and saw her friend throwing pottery on the wheel. "I really had one of those moments where I just looked at what she was doing, and I just said, 'That is the coolest thing. I'm going to do that.'"

Meat-Free

Mar 18, 2016

A visit to a local kitchen to learn how to make cashew cheese, vegetable gardening tips, then KCUR's Food Critics search out the best vegetarian (and vegan) food in and around KC.

Guests:

Plate / Facebook

“I’ve always maintained that the best vegetarian food you can find anywhere is deep-fried,” joked KCUR Food Critic Charles Ferruzza.

But Kansas City’s meatless food scene has blossomed over the past few years. In addition to vegetarian and vegan-only restaurants, chefs at restaurants of all stripes are getting creative.

“I think people have such an unfortunate misunderstanding that vegetarian food is bland,” commented guest Food Critic Lisa Murphy. “And when done properly, it’s absolutely not. It’s every bit as flavorful and as delightful as food made with meat.”

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

Growing up, Tony Berg remembers the excitement of getting the newspaper.

"That was how we got news. I remember every day, go out to the driveway and it was like Christmas," he told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR's Central Standard.

And for Berg, being the new publisher of The Kansas City Star is a dream job.

“I feel like this is my hometown and this is my hometown paper,” he said.

It was the first newspaper he ever read, and he now considers himself its ambassador. Meet the new publisher of The Kansas City Star.

Guest:

courtesy of David Lane

For Kansas City photographer David Lane, the night sky is a canvas where he composes Milky Way-themed works of art.

“The glow that is in those pictures is from 250 billion suns," Lane says. "To see that represented, it helps give our place in the universe."

We check in on the MidCoast Takeover, a showcase of local and regional bands at the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas.

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