KC Currents
7:55 am
Fri December 20, 2013

Hallmark, Boxer Tommy Campbell, Panhandler’s Life-Changing Year

The show for December 19, 2013. Click "Listen" to hear the entire show; see below for individual stories.

Hallmark Cookie Exchang Feeds Artistic Community

Since the mid-1960's, Hallmark employees, past and present, and their spouses, have gathered each year - not for an exchange of greeting cards, but of cookies. KCUR’s Julie Denesha stopped by this year’s cookie exchange to bring us this audio postcard.

As Greeting Card Sales Decline, What Is The Future Of Hallmark?

Here in Kansas City, the name Hallmark means a lot. The century-old company is one of Kansas City’s staunchest corporate citizens. But more recently the industry has begun facing hurtles; people just aren’t sending cards the way they used to. We discuss how Hallmark trying to reinvent itself in the digital, and the effects company layoffs and restructuring have on Kansas City’s life and culture.

Tommy Campbell: The Greatest Boxer You’ve Never Heard Of

Kansas City, Ks. native Tommy Campbell was known as the "Chocolate Ice Cube."
Credit Courtesy of Phil Dixon

In the late 1940s and early 50’s, the Kansas City, Ks. native became the world’s number-two-ranked lightweight fighter. He won almost as many fights as Muhammad Ali. But his boxing career was cut short when he stood up against mob-controlled promoters and boxing matchmakers. Author Phil Dixon, tells the story in his upcoming book Tommy Campbell: A Boxing Bout with the Mob.

After Coming Into Money, Kansas City Panhandler Reflects On Big Changes

No one has a 2013 story to tell quite like Billy Ray Harris. He went from panhandling on the Country Club Plaza in Kansas City, Mo., to being a national media sensation after he returned a lost engagement ring that was accidentally dropped in his panhandling cup.

How To Be Merry At The Office Holiday Party Without Losing Your Job

We asked KCUR’s online and radio audience this week for your do's and don’ts at workplace shindigs during the holidays. A lot of your advice stemmed from the open bar at the parties, including how much to drink and how to know when to stop to avoid unnecessary embarrassment – or a visit with a human resources representative.

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