KC Currents
4:50 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Downtown Resurrection, Harvey Girls, Audio Theater Festival

The show for June 16, 2013. Click "Listen" to hear the entire show; see below for individual stories.

Rez Downtown Builds Urban Church Community

The renaissance of downtown that’s happened in recent years has attracted more than restaurants and real estate developers. As more and more people have come to live, work and hang out downtown, churches have also had their eyes on the area. While many of the older urban congregations have seen their numbers dwindle, one of Kansas City’s biggest churches has had some big success in delivering old-time religion to the new generation of Kansas City urbanites.

Harvey Girls waitressed at restaurants along the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroads. Many of these women transitioned to other careers after WWII. Opal Jaquess, on the far right side of the first row, is interviewed in the film, Opportunity Bound.
Credit Courtesy of Opal Jaquess

New Documentary Tells Harvey Girls Story

America’s tales about taming the “Wild West” rarely include women. But in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, more than 100,000 pioneering young women left home to work as waitresses in restaurants located on train platforms along the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe  Railway.  They were called “Harvey Girls” because they worked in a chain started by Leavenworth entrepreneur Fred Harvey.  Filmmaker Katrina Parks tells this story in her new documentary called "The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound," which will premiere at the National Archives at Kansas City on Friday evening.

Memory Project Aims To Tell Bosnians’ Collective Narrative Of War

Next year will mark the 20th anniversary of when the first refugees from the Bosnian War arrived in the United States.  Many of them made their home in St. Louis, which is now believed to have the largest Bosnian population outside of Eastern Europe. Some St. Louis locals are remembering the brutal ethnic war that many Bosnians fled.

HEAR Now Festival Showcases Classic And Contemporary Radio Dramatists

The golden age of radio drama might have been in the 1930s and 40s, but you don’t hear much on the airwaves anymore.  Still, practitioners say the genre is alive and kicking in podcasts, audiobooks, and even video games.  Next weekend, Kansas City plays host to “Hear Now: The Audio Arts and Fiction Festival,” which will draw old-timey radio voices as well as younger producers. 

The Silver Maggies

We end the show with the song “End of Time” from The Silver Maggies’ first full-length album My Pale Horse. The Silver Maggies describe their sound as “high desert noir, gothic country and Midwestern roots Americana.” Their next show is this Thursday, June 20 at The Riot Room.

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