Steve Kraske

Host of Up to Date

Steve Kraske is an associate teaching professor of journalism at UMKC, a political columnist for The Kansas City Star and has hosted "Up to Date" since 2002. He worked as the full-time political correspondent for The Star from 1994-2013 covering national, state and local campaigns. He also has covered the statehouses in Topeka and Jefferson City.

Before arriving in Kansas City, he worked at daily newspapers in Iowa and Illinois and at United Press International in Madison, Wis. Kraske is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism. He was a 1992 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

Kraske has won awards for both his print and radio work and has appeared on NPR, CNN and Fox. He's a big fan of "Prairie Home Companion" and Kansas City jazz. His father lives in Stillwater, Minn., not far from the St. Croix River.

Becoming a grandparent can have vivid effects on a person. Journalist Lesley Stahl's new book, Becoming Grandma, explores the evolution of close relationships, personal transformation, and the intense joy that came over her when she held her grand-daughters for the first time.

When Al-Qaida moved into Timbuktu, Mali, the terror group was bent on enforcing Shariah law, threatening many historical artifacts in the region. That's when an African collector and adventurer, Abdel Kader Haidara, took it upon himself to salvage and smuggle more than 370,0000 ancient manuscripts out of harm's way.

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With the birth of his first-born, Brian Gordon quickly learned that parenting wasn't exactly what he'd expected, much less what had been promised. So Gordon turned to cartooning, creating a duck family to comment on the joys and pains of parenthood in Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting

You may not have heard of Octave Chanute before but, if you live in or around Kansas City, chances are you're affected by his work. Local historian Bill Nicks explains Chanute's lasting importance to aviation, and where you can still find evidence of his legacy in the metro.

For a century Jewish cuisine in America was the recipes that arrived with immigrants from Eastern Europe ... matzo balls, brisket, bagels and latkes. Now the influence of Mediterranean Jews is making its way to our shores.

Guest:

  • Chef Joyce Goldstein is a food consultant and the author of The New Mediterranean Jewish Table: Old World Recipes for the Modern Home.

The majority of Kansas City area companies aren't marketing to other countries.  On this edition of Up to Date, we learn how a new strategy is attempting to aid local enterprises in becoming global ones.

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Most people have experience with a boss or manager who was less than inspiring. Former Kansas state Rep. Ed O'Malley, who heads up the Kansas Leadership Center in Wichita, says leadership is an activity, not a role, and should not be limited to those in high places.

For those who suffer from food allergies, limiting certain foods can be a matter of life or death. Even though we’ve come a long way in understanding these allergies, more children are being diagnosed with them.

Guests:

  • Dr. Chitra Dinakar is a pediatric allergy & immunology physician at Children’s Mercy Hospital. She’s also a professor of pediatrics at the UMKC School of Medicine.
  • Dr. Natasha Burgert is with Pediatric Associates of Kansas City.

Along the presidential campaign trail, candidates are deriding free trade agreements, like the pending Trans-Pacific Partnership. But here in the Midwest farmers and ranchers, the people behind one of our biggest industries, are bucking the trend.

Guests:

  • Kristofer Husted is a reporter for KCUR's Harvest Public Media. He's based at KBIA in Columbia, Missouri.
  • Chad Hart is an associate professor of economics at Iowa State University, where he's a crop markets specialist.

It's widely acknowledged that college graduates earn more than non-graduates, but given the ever-increasing cost of higher education, is it still worth the investment? Up To Date's Smart Money Experts weigh in. Also, an update on recent financial headlines. 

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Gaining prominence first as Lieutenant Sulu on Star Trek, George Takei's fame has spread off the stage, too. On this edition of Up To Date, Takei talks about his work advocating for social justice and how he maintains such a deft social media presence.

George Takei will appear at Planet Comicon Kansas City at Bartle Hall on May 21 and 22. For more information, or to buy passes, visit the Planet Comicon website.

She was touring Europe in her teens, plays fluently in genres from jazz to Baroque, and her music was launched with space shuttle Atlantis. We speak with multiple Grammy Award-winning guitarist Sharon Isbin, and sample some of her music.

Sharon Isbin will be performing with mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard at the Folly Theater on April 15 as part of the Harriman-Jewell performing arts series. For more information, go to hjseries.org.

When it comes to taxes, are we morally obligated to pay them to help our society? As presidential nominating conventions come up, is it ethical for a party to change the rules to block a candidate, even if he or she has a large majority of the popular vote? Up To Date's Ethics professors tackle these issues and more.

Guests:

  • Clancy Martin is a professor of philosophy at UMKC.
  • Adrian Switzer is an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy at the UMKC.

Across the globe, distinct political institutions and governing mechanisms have developed, but how and when did political order even begin? Starting with our primate ancestors through the eve of the French Revolution, we look at how our politics continue to evolve — or not — today.

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As major league teams spend more and more money on pitchers, arm injury rates for the men — and boys — on the mound are becoming increasingly common.

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Is there anything Roy Blount, Jr. hasn't written about?  We speak with the author about his latest book, Save Room For Pie, sharing a stage with Bruce Springsteen, and some of his most notable celebrity interviews. 

Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters.

Here's a list of the films included in the program:

  • Marguerite
  • Krisha
  • Midnight Special
  • Demolition
  • Baskin
  • King Georges
  • I Saw the Light
  • City of Gold
  • Eye in the Sky
  • Hello, My Name is Doris
  • Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict

Is our definition of what it means to be 'literate' changing in a digital age? Should it? We talk about why young people today need to understand how to use digital media for all aspects of their lives.

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In 1967, a young woman runner looked to make the Boston Marathon her first marathon. She signed up using her first two initials and her surname. That year, Kathrine Switzer became the first registered female runner of the Boston Marathon, an event that changed the course of her life.

America has privately funded social and cultural efforts for centuries. We take a look at the history of philanthropy and the impact charitable giving has in this country . 

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Whether it's the debate over GMO labeling, or diseases affecting livestock and the changing business of agriculture, the reporters from Harvest Public Media, based at KCUR, are at the scene. We talk with them the state of the food system in the United States today.  

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If raising the World Series banner at Kauffman Stadium on Sunday wasn't enough, Tuesday's awarding of the Series rings was the just the excuse Up to Date was looking for for a trip to The K.  We take you behind the scenes as we talk with sportswriters, the team's official scorer, the man behind the public address system and just what it takes to secure that World Series trophy. 

Expectations are high for new Kansas City Public Schools Superintendent Mark Bedell and the challenges, including regaining full accreditation, are great.  We visit with the new superintendent on his first visit to the district.

From sleeplessness to loss of appetite, the symptoms of short-term depression can be tough, even on our animals. And like humans, they too might need emotional support after a loss in their pack or pride.

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Last week, students from Hyman Brand Hebrew Academy in Johnson County, Kansas and University Academy in Kansas City, Missouri boarded a bus for a Civil Rights Tour of the South. What they found were new relationships and a surprising shared history. 

Guests:

  • Jazmyne Smith is a junior at University Academy.
  • Amanda Sokol is a sophomore at Hyman Brand Hebrew Academy.

For Randy Schekman, it all began with a toy microscope and pond scum. Now he’s a recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his role in figuring out the science now used to produce one-third of the insulin used worldwide by diabetics, and the entire world’s supply of the Hepatitis B vaccine.

Low-wage workers nationwide are continuing their fight to raise the minimum wage and have a voice in the workplace. On this edition of Up To Date, we talk about the important role women play in the labor movement, back in the 60s and today. 

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A little more than a year after the Sept. 11th attacks, more than 1,500 cassette tapes were recovered from a house that Osama bin Laden once occupied. Those tapes were vetted then passed from the FBI to CNN, Williams College and then Yale, until someone else took the time to actually listen.

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Local Listen: The Conquerors

Mar 23, 2016

The Conquerors, a Kansas City band, has a 1967 flavor that works well in these days of throwback sound. KCUR music reviewer Bill Brownlee feels that after much practice, their performances have vastly improved since their 2010 inception.

The Conquerors perform at The Riot Room on Monday, March 28 at 8 p.m.

 

Many remember the name Thomas Frank for his book, What's the Matter With Kansas, in which he details the rise of conservatism in the middle of the country. Now, he has his eye on Democrats' failures in his latest book, Listen Liberal.  

Thomas Frank will speak at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 24, at the Plaza Branch of the Kansas City Public Library. For tickets and information, visit rainydaybooks.com.

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