Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Ways to Connect

A look at what's going on at this week's TechWeek conference in KC. Plus, an encore interview with the CEO of KC-based EyeVerify, which just sold for a lot of money (reportedly $100 million) to Alibaba.

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Colleges are attracting more students than ever before. And when they get there from rural or urban settings, from diverse backgrounds, they have to figure out — some for the first time — how to deal with difference.

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Recently, Google Maps started showing "areas of interest" in an orange color on the app. KC's areas of interested included the Plaza and Crown Center. Not included: 18th and Vine or the ruins of Quindaro in KCK.

We explore the ways that computer algorithms could reflect someone's prejudice or assumptions — or perhaps just reinforce our own.

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It's a familiar sight in airplanes today: hordes of people, trying to avoid the checked baggage fee, struggling to shove their wheelie suitcases in an overhead compartment.

But a KU professor says that checked baggage fees not only are improving an airline's bottom line — they also make the flying experience better.

Guest:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Bishop James Johnston came to town to lead KC's Catholics at a challenging time — and he started with an apology on behalf of the church. We check in on what's being done to address the sexual abuse scandal that engulfed his predecessor, and we'll hear his journey from electrical engineering to shepherding a flock of some 130,000 Catholic faithful here.

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Peretz Partensky / Flickr -- CC

Hardly a day goes by when guns aren't in the news. Even in the face of violence, American gun owners continue to be passionate about both constitutional rights and the importance of guns in their lives. 

We set aside the gun policy debate and invite local gun owners of various backgrounds to share why guns are important to them.

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From sushi to paella, rice is a staple in many different cultures. Closer to home, we'll hear about growing rice in Missouri, plus how one local chef buys and prepares it. Then, our Food Critics uncover the best rice dishes in and around Kansas City.

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A talk with a local visual and performing artist who has just released his first collection of poetry.

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Chico Sierra has a reading on September 15 at the Raven Bookstore in Lawrence.

 

You may not know his name, but you might know his work: the giant, colorful animals lurking on walls around the Crossroads and Westport, and in the halls of Children's Mercy Hospital. Meet Scribe, who has a new children's book and an album of music inspired by his art coming out this month.

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Alissa Walker / Flickr -- CC

Before LaCroix Sparkling Water became a trendy drink, it was a favorite of Midwestern moms, according to reporter Libby Nelson in a recent article.

How did the drink that Nelson remembers from her KC childhood as "the pastel cases of tasteless soda that my Girl Scout leader packed into her minivan" go from a Midwestern staple to a status symbol?

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The DLC / Flickr -- CC

How do you tell a city's history? We talk with the head of one of the city's largest and most important historical collections on his last day on the job.

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Stefani Fontana / KCUR 89.3

Former KCUR intern Stefani Fontana, now a fourth-year medical student at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, spent the summer of 2015 doing clinical rotation in western Kansas. Fontana joins us to share some of her experiences.

Read the KCUR series "Reflections Of A Med Student: How Rural Medicine Taught Me To Be A Better Doctor."

Guest:

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

It's been a good century in Missouri — if you're a river otter or an elk. But for red wolves and the white-tailed jackrabbit? Not so much.

With the recent release of The Wild Mammals of Missouri: Third Revised Edition, we invite a local natural history biologist to explore how our local animal populations have changed over time. 

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Why are so many teachers running for political office? We talk with local educators who want to be local legislators.

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Why get married? Once, there was a time where that might have seemed like a silly question. But now, many people can tell you exactly why not. We examine how marriage has been changing over the last few decades ... and what it might look like in the future.

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A lot of people think social media is cutting into how well we interact with each other in real life. A local researcher says that may not be the case.

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A new program at KU allows community college students to earn an Associate's and a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing at the same time. Dr. Nelda Godfrey of the KU Medical Center explains the program and what it means for the future of nursing education.

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A train leaves from Kansas City to Wichita traveling at 55 mph. Meanwhile, another train ... Wait a second, who cares? One KU researcher does. Michael Orosco shares his innovative approach to motivating students to enjoy math, and excel at it. Also on the show, a local algebra teacher discusses his techniques.

Guests:

Matthew Long-Middleton / KCUR 89.3

From empanadas to samosas and dumplings (and dessert versions), our Food Critics search out the best dough-wrapped dishes in and around KC.

Plus, an interview about Nepalese dumplings live from the Ethnic Enrichment Festival, a primer on kolaches and how love led one restaurant owner to KC, where she serves up Jamaican patties.

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Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

We explore why the world of science fiction is a battleground for issues of race, gender and identity — and why that field of battle is here in KC over the next few days at the World Science Fiction Convention.

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Courtesy Liana Marti Perez

KC's Brazilian community has been watching the Olympics in Rio with the rest of us, but through a particular lens of pride ... and concern.

We talk to some local Brazilian expats to hear what they think of the Olympics — and how Brazil is being portrayed.

Guests:

  • Carolina Shank, KC resident from Rio
  • Otavio Silva, local resident from Brazil
  • Liana Marti Perez, local resident who is at the Olympics

 

How are Kansas City's athletes doing at the Rio Olympics? KCUR's sports reporter gives us an update.

Guest:

Kyle Smith / KCUR 89.3

A former contestant on Project Runway: Junior discusses how his upbringing in Minneapolis, Kansas influences his creations — and how his design aesthetic is geared towards "BA women who want to look glamorous."

In this encore presentation of Central Standard, we revisit our conversation with teenage fashion designer Jaxson Metzler.

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Courtesy of Amina Hood / Amina Marie Millinery

Hats may not seem like the cutting edge of fashion, but one Brookside milliner is drawing international attention nevertheless. We invite Kansas City's own Amina Hood to share the personal story of her craft.

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Summer Fun

Aug 11, 2016

What did you do in the summer as a kid? How important is it that kids learn something and stay busy ... or get fresh air? As summer draws to a close, we explore how summer vacation is changing.

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As part of a series on mental health care in Kansas by Heartland Health Monitor, we take a look at the history of Topeka's landmark mental health center: the Menninger Clinic.

Guest:

  • Roy Menninger, former president, Menninger Clinic

Graphic novels are becoming more popular ... and they're also evolving. What exactly are they? A chat with someone who taught high-schoolers about this, plus two local authors, whose graphic novel was a finalist for the 2016 Eisner Award.

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More than a thousand of his musical works have been published, and they're performed everywhere from Carnegie Hall to your local church choir loft. We hear from Kansas City's own Mark Hayes, about his journey from playing the church piano as a teen, to becoming an internationally-known composer out of his home in KC. 

Guest:

Alyson Raletz / KCUR

Legendary KCUR and Kansas City radio reporter Dan Verbeck recently had a brush with death. With the help of his speedy arrival at the hospital, and the medical team's use of a technique called "therapeutic hypothermia," he was revived from a near fatal heart attack.

We hear Dan's story from his perspective, and then we hear from his doctor about the medical advances that allowed this to happen.

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Are you tired of politics yet? Neither are we! On this Audiophiles episode, we take a dive into some of the best political podcasts.

Guests:

  • Matt Staub
  • Kyle J. Smith

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