Maria Carter

Newscaster, News Director

Maria Carter grew up in a small town in the Missouri Ozarks. She graduated from Reed College in Portland, Ore. with a degree in economics. After a year off, she returned to her home state to study journalism at the University of Missouri, receiving her Master’s degree in 2004.

Maria started working at KCUR as an intern and was later hired as a general assignment reporter. She covers local politics and anything else happening in the Kansas City area. In 2006, she spent a month in northern Louisiana, lending a hand at the local public radio station and covering the thousands of evacuees temporarily in the area.

Ways To Connect

Maria Carter / KCUR

Development, even redevelopment, isn’t unusual in the Kansas City area, but concrete examples of successfully working across state or county borders to do that are harder to come by. Yet that’s what happening at the district surrounding 47th and Mission.

John Norton, another professor involved in the scandal surrounding the Bloch School of Management at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, is stepping down. 

Earlier this month, the University of Missouri Board of Curators released the results of an independent audit. It found UMKC submitted false data to the Princeton Review.

University of Kansas

Elden C. Tefft, best known for his iconic bronze sculptures on the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, died Tuesday. He was 95.

KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little said the campus is privileged to have Tefft’s work.

“Elden’s pieces are such an integral part of Mount Oread — pieces such as ‘Moses’ and ‘Academic Jay’ — that it’s nearly impossible to imagine our campus without them,” said Gray-Little.

University of Missouri-Kansas City professor Michael Song has resigned. He was at the center of the controversy surrounding UMKC’s Henry W. Bloch School of Management.

Song said his presence had become a distraction.

“For the best interests of the students and programs, I have reluctantly decided to resign from UMKC so that everyone can focus on doing the important thing — training the next generation of entrepreneurs and innovators,” Songsaid in a press release issued by UMKC.

UMKC Chancellor Leo Morton accepted Song’s resignation and thanked him for his service.

Brrrr! It's cold out there. Temperatures across the area in the single digits. A few schools, mostly in rural areas, have canceled classes today. 

Cancelations:

A report released Friday confirms the rankings of the University of Missouri-Kansas City’s Bloch School of Management.

The Journal of Product Innovation Management ranked the Bloch School number one in innovation management research. Controversy started last year after an article in the Kansas City Star questioned the validity of ranking the school as a global leader.

The following schools are closed, unless noted otherwise:

Muslim groups are calling for federal and investigations into what police says is the intentional hit and run death of a Kansas City teen outside the Somali Center at Admiral and Paseo.

Police say a man in an SUV intentionally struck the teen while he was getting into a car, nearly severing his legs.  The teen died at the hospital.

Police say a 30-year-old suspect was arrested after he tried to flee on foot.

Pat Roberts campaign.

Kansas State University is being drawn into the Senate campaign for Republican Sen. Pat Roberts, despite protests from the university.   

Longtime K-State Football coach Bill Snyder seems to endorse Roberts in a new campaign ad. 

The problem? Political endorsements aren't allowed by university policy.

Police evacuated the University of Missouri-Kansas City's Health Sciences Building Thursday morning after city crews working at 25th and Holmes reported a gas leak.  

A UMKC spokesman estimates some 200 faculty, staff and students were evacuated from the Health Sciences building. It houses the schools of pharmacy and nursing.

Frank Morris / KCUR

Gov. Jay Nixon has ordered the National Guard to help restore order in Ferguson, Mo., as protests and sometimes violent confrontations continue.

KCUR's Frank Morris is reporting from Ferguson, and talked with us about his experience there.

Interview highlights:

On whether media coverage has accurately reflected the reality in Ferguson

Laura Spencer / KCUR

Most people go to Boulevard Drive-In in Kansas City, Kan., to watch what’s on the big screen, but this weekend they might stumble upon something a little strange on the way to the snack bar — a two-piece band accompanied by a half dozen or so kids playing music on fruits and vegetables. 

This weekend will be the second time the duo set up at the drive-in,

Earlier this summer, as Dave Cedillo started unloading computer equipment, amps, and vegetables, he explained his set up.

After months of debate and a second vote, the Roeland Park, Kan., city council approved an anti-discrimination ban, granting equal protection regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

In July, council member Beck Fast missed the vote, saying she was in a car accident. The ordinance lost by a 4-3 vote. Fast was present for the vote Monday evening and tied the vote at 4-4. Roeland Park Mayor Joel Marquardt broke the tie and passed the ordinance.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Update, 1:10 p.m.

The Republican National Committee announced Wednesday that Cleveland, Ohio, and Dallas, Texas, were finalists to host the 2016 Republican Convention. Kansas City and Denver have been eliminated.

Committee members were in Kansas City earlier this month to tour facilities and meet city officials. In a release, the committee says the decision was based on a review of bids and information gathered at site visits to each city.

dustjelly / Flickr-CC

As the 2014 FIFA World Cup kicks off this week in Brazil, many soccer fans in Kansas City will be cheering for the U.S. men's team and Sporting KC players Matt Besler and Graham Zusi.

But many other Kansas Citians will cheer on teams from around the globe.

For optimum World Cup viewing, we've rounded up a list of local places to go for a more international soccer experience:

Brazil: Taste of Brazil Market, 25 E. 3rd St, Kansas City, Mo. 

Scripps National Spelling Bee

The Scripps National Spelling Bee takes place this week in Washington, D.C., and the Kansas City area will be represented by six youth from middle schools across the region.

Two local competitors received international media attention for their marathon battle to represent Jackson County, but besides Kush Sharma, who won that battle, five other students are also representing the Kansas City area in the national competition.

Here are the six kids to root for as the National Spelling Bee commences:

Ethan Perris

Age: 13

Wikipedia -- CC

It may not be football season, but chicken wings are still a popular appetizer at many restaurants and bars.

The Central Standard Food critics stopped by KCUR to give us their Kansas City favorites from traditional Buffalo wings to exotic preparations.

Here are their recommendations:

JJ’s restaurant will re-open across the street from its former location on the Country Club Plaza, which was destroyed by an explosion on Feb. 19, 2013.

The new location will be in the lobby of the Plaza Vista building at 960 W. 48th Place and feature a large patio.

Plaza Vista is home to the Polsinelli law firm and opened in November 2013. The area has been in construction since 2005, much of it was part of the failed West Edge project. 

A citizen taskforce soon could make a recommendation for the future of Kansas City International Airport. 

After nearly a year of work, the group has narrowed the many possible options down to three — renovating the existing terminals and building new screening areas and parking facilities, revamping two terminals and connecting them with a central building, or constructing a new terminal. 

Architect Bob Berkebile helped draw up plans for KCI more than four decades ago. He now co-chairs the advisory group.

Interview highlights

Dr. William Lewis Corporon, 69, was taking his grandson Reat Underwood, 14, to a singing audition at the Jewish Community Center when both were fatally shot Sunday afternoon.

Corporon and his wife of 49 years, Melinda, moved to Johnson County, Kan., in 2003 to be closer to his family. Before that, he practiced family medicine in Oklahoma for more than 25 years.  He continued to see patients in the Kansas City area.

Cities

Excelsior Springs Council (2 elected)

* Sharon Powell 775
* Ambrose Buckman 772
Mark Spohn 663
Reggie St. John 543

Excelsior Springs bond issue

Shall the city issue up to $18 million in bonds to build a community center? (4/7ths majority.)

* Yes 982
No 596

Gladstone Council

* R.D. Mallams 1158
Shari Le Poindexter 654

Grain Valley mayor

* Michael Todd 331
Chuck Johnston 274
Barbara Kountzman 202

Results below are for contested races only.  All those running unopposed won.

Leawood

Council Member - Ward 3

  • Tom Robinett  58.2%
  • James M. Stephens 40.9%

Mission

Mayor

  • Steven Schowengerdt  50.5%
  • David Shepard 49.4%

Council Member - Ward 1

  • Steven Lucas 55.6%
  • Jay A. Meyer 43.8%

Council Member - Ward 2 

  • Arcie Rothrock 56.3%
  • William J. Vandenberg, III 43.8%

Council Member - Ward 4 

"Tinkering" might conjure up images of a garage workshop or someone just puttering around, but a new book is putting a different spin on the term.

On Friday's Up to Date, author Karen Wilkinson joins us to discuss what she calls "the art of tinkering" and some of the creative ways anyone can become a tinkerer.

Guest:

People have ideas for inventions all the time, but getting those ideas made into consumer products can be a difficult journey.

On Friday's Up to Date, we talk with a representative of Quirky.com, a website that connects the entrepreneurs with the means to produce their ideas.

Guest:

  • Nathaniel Padgett, Quirky.com
Giles Moss / Flickr-CC

When you tell people you're an inventor, it conjures up images of a mad scientist slaving away in a lab. But what's it really like to be an inventor in Kansas City?

On Friday's Up to Date, we talk with local inventor Rich Melton about where he finds his inspiration, the roadblocks he's encountered and how he got started.

Guest:

  • Rich Melton, inventor
Courtesy / Kansas City, Mo.

Mayor Sly James delivered his state of the city address Monday to around 400 high school students at Park Hill High School in Kansas City, Mo.

Part of the Mayor's message involved teens and raucous crowds on the Plaza and at the Zoo. James says young people are a strategic investment.

“It’s clear to me that young people need to have some level of guidance. They need good role models. They need solid direction. They need hope," said James. "They need a quality education and they need to know somebody out there gives a damn about them."

Courtesy: National World War I Museum

This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, and a new exhibit at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., details the events that led up to the war — from the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand to the declaration of war a month later on July 28, 1914.

The exhibit presents archival newspaper articles and diplomatic communications from around the world. 

Children's Mercy Hospital is expanding a camp designed for kids with ADHD for the summer of 2014.

The camp was modeled on the work of Bill Pelham who opened the first one in 1980. What makes these camps different is a focus on behavioral modification with an intense connection between the camp, the campers and the parents.

According to Dr. Trista Perez Crawford, the camp costs about $4,000 for the summer but offers the equivalent of what would be approximately six years of weekly hour long behavioral therapy.

Gage Skidmore / wikimedia commons

Actor LeVar Burton joins Central Standard to talk about his career and dedication to literacy. He says he's been profoundly influenced by his mother and father who modeled for him a life of service.

Burton is an advocate for children's literacy and is working on launching the Reading Rainbow app. He will be in Kansas City on Saturday, March 15 for Planet Comicon.

GUEST:

Maria Carter / KCUR

The Jackson County Spelling Bee finally came to an end Saturday morning, sending 13-year-old Kush Sharma of Kansas City, Mo, to the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

Sharma and 11-year-old Sophia Hoffman of Lee’s Summit went through the entire list of provided words during their first match up on Feb. 22. Organizers selected 20 more words from the dictionary before calling it a tie.

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