Hannah Copeland

Intern, Arts & Digital

Hannah Copeland is an intern at KCUR, and works with the Arts desk and digital team.

Hannah is a senior at UMKC studying Business Entrepreneurship. Being an avid NPR listener all her life, she enrolled in a class in 2013 with Up to Date host Steve Kraske in the hopes of learning how to write for radio. She is now a Communication Studies minor and completing her second internship with KCUR.

During the summer of 2014, Hannah was an intern with Up to Date.  

Hannah has always been interested in arts and music business endeavors, hence the entrepreneurship major. When not interning, sitting in class, or bartending — Hannah loves playing and recording music, and thrift shopping.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

In March, for the first time, the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival staged a production not at Southmoreland Park in Midtown Kansas City, Missouri, but indoors, at Johnson County Community College’s Polsky Theatre.

Working without having to worry about rain, bugs, and people walking their dogs made the festival’s typical technical challenges a breeze, says executive artistic director Sidonie Garrett.

Courtesy Nuwayv

Earlier this year when the Folk Alliance International conference was underway in Kansas City, Central Standard interviewed local musicians from different genres about how they write songs. That inspired us to launch a new series: "Story of a Song."

For this installment, Hannah Copeland spoke with members of the Kansas City band, Nuwayv, which defines its music as "rugged soul." Hannah explains how the four artists collaborated to write their new album’s final track, “We Shinin.”

Hannah Copeland / KCUR

Dozens of Kansas City bands performed at Folk Alliance International's 27th annual music conference and Winter Music Camp, Feb. 18-22 at Crown Center. Local musicians were among the thousands of musicians, concert promoters, industry representatives, folk DJs, and other supporters occupying the convention hotels for what Folk Alliance called "Planet Folk."

Days before the deadline for a clarinet and saxophone competition to win $1,000 and a trip to Paris, Gunnar Gidner could barely stand. A spinal injury had left him unable to walk, much less practice his tenor saxophone, for two and a half months.

Gidner had recovered enough to return to school at the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance in December. His jazz combo was rehearsing on his first day back, and Gidner’s professor, Dan Thomas, heard the recording and thought it was good. Really good.

Wikipedia Commons

Kansas City is finally honoring jazz icon Charlie Parker with a two-week celebration that kicks off today. The celebration is centered on the occasion of what would have been Parker’s 94th birthday. It includes a 21-sax salute at Lincoln Cemetery where Parker is buried.

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art has unveiled plans for a bold expansion. The museum is talking about greater green spaces, walkways, and more sculptures as part of a gleaming cultural district. The new district would extend a mile in every direction from Oak Street and Emanuel Cleaver Boulevard. It’s a huge statement that could carry some pain as pieces of nearby historic neighborhoods would vanish to make way for this new vision.

Wikimedia Commons

This fall, the city of Prairie Village, Kan., will remove 100 ash trees from city property due to Emerald Ash Borer infestation.

The Emerald Ash Borer is considered the most destructive forest pest in North America. Its larva bore into ash trees, cuts off nutrients and kills the tree.

Before 2002, the dime-size iridescent beetle had never been detected in North America. It’s predicted that the species arrived in ashwood used for stabilizing cargo.

Rich Hill

Seventy miles south of Kansas City, there was a documentary filmed that critic Bob Butler says will break your heart. Rich Hill tells the story of three boys coming of age with at least one hand tied behind their back. They deal with crushing poverty, incarcerated parents, and lots of moving around. Juxtaposed with the external hardships, these adolescents must also confront ADHD and bi-polar disorder. On Friday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske visits with one of the film's directors.

I Origins

On Friday's Up to Date, our indie, foreign, and documentary film critics review the latest films showing on area screens.

Philip Seymour Hoffman plays an old-school German spy heading up a post 9/11 operation. By the time A Most Wanted Man was released, Hoffman was dead from a drug overdose.

Listen for the scoop on that film, along with two documentaries looking at the lives of author Gore Vidal and film critic Roger Ebert, a science-fiction drama, and the latest offering from Zach Braff.

Josh Grimes / NightLifeKC.com

For the competitor, the spectator, or the music fanatic- Brian McTavish's Weekend To-Do List surely has the Kansas City area event to rock your weekend!

U.S. Air Guitar National Finals
Fake strumming elevated to an art form
Saturday 8 p.m.
Midland Theatre, 1228 Main
Tickets: $20

Justin Schultis

The Missouri State Fair starts in Sedalia this Thursday, and the Kansas State Fair is close behind, opening on September 5th. In addition to giant funnel cakes and whirling carnival rides, the State Fairs have a more serious side: competition. On Monday's Up to Date, host Steve Kraske speaks with past and present state fair champions to find out what brings them back year after for that blue ribbon.

Hannah Copeland / KCUR

Next week voters will cast their votes for Chair of the Johnson County Board of Commissioners— the highest elected office in the county. They’ll narrow the field from three candidates down to the two who will be on the November ballot. All three joined Friday's Up to Date for a candidate forum, their last before Tuesday’s election.

Guests:

Theresa Thompson / Flickr-CC

On Thursday's Up to Date, guest host Brian Ellison covers primary ballot issues on both sides of the state line. In Kansas, KCUR has kept an eye on Milton Wolf and Sen. Pat Roberts as they battle to be the Republican nominee for the U.S.

6Lawrence.com

Have you ever stayed up all night talking? Try doing it for 66 hours straight. A Lawrence TV host is about to try in an attempt to shatter the world record for longest television marathon talk show. On Friday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with host of The Not So Late Show about his strategies for staying awake, and keeping a live audience engaged for over two and a half days.

Guest: 

Starlight Theatre

 The hills are alive with the sound of...hip hop, comedy, and rock & roll. No matter your taste in entertainment, Brian McTavish's Weekend To-Do list is sure to have you covered!

The Sound of Music
Classic family musical
Opens at 8 p.m. Friday with performances through July 31
Starlight Theatre in Swope Park
Tickets: Start at $12

Since the 1970s, small businesses have provided a net of two-thirds of all new jobs. Today, they create 55 percent of all jobs in this country. Three local entrepreneurs, who make up part of this trend, appeared on Up to Date to talk about about starting and sustaining a small business in the Kansas City area.

ifckc.com

Brian McTavish's Weekend To-Do List packs entertainment for every taste, from one big picnic to a funky art festival. Have a fantastic weekend!

Steely Dan
Classic rock under the stars
8 p.m. Saturday
Starlight Theatre, Swope Park
Tickets: $40 to$150

MId-America glcc

In the 1920s and '30s, Kansas City was defined by the corruption of the political machine run by “Boss” Tom Pendergast. But the machine finally was brought down, in no small part through the efforts of reform-minded women.

Former Kansas City Mayor Kay Barnes tells the story of these “civic housekeepers” whose fight came to a dramatic conclusion with the ballot-box victories of 1940, Pendergast’s imprisonment in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, and the smashing of machine-mob rule.

Guest:

Clint Eastwood for A Fistful of Dollars / Wikimedia Commons

A half century ago, nobody expected much of Sergio Leone’s 1964 Italian Western A Fistful of Dollars – not even its young American star, Clint Eastwood. On Wednesday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske explores how this film's fiery success ignited the popularity of an entire genre known as "spaghetti westerns".

Guests:

The Kansas City Auto Museum

Kansas City holds an astonishing amount of auto history from the first African-American auto dealer in the U.S. to the park and boulevard system started in the 1890s that shaped our city's traffic flow today.

Beth Lipoff / Up to Date

His career includes multi-platinum recordings, 200-plus live performances per year, two Emmy and five Grammy nominations, conductor of the Pasadena Pops, nightclub owner, and that’s just the half of it. Perhaps his greatest recognition, though, is as “Ambassador of the Great American Songbook”. On Friday's Up to Date, Michael Feinstein talks with Steve Kraske about his love of classic American popular music and his efforts to preserve it for future generations.

Monty Python's Spamalot

Whether it's live music, comedy theatre, or the largest water slide on earth, Brian McTavish's Weekend To-Do List has got you covered for summertime entertainment!

Verruckt Water Slide
Opening of the world's largest water slide
Opens Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily
Schlitterbahn Water Park, 9400 State Ave., Kansas City, Kan.
Admission: $36.99; $28.99 for ages 3 to 11/55 and older

Butterflyxoeio / Flickr Creative Commons

So, you like animals? You enjoy watching them, taking care of them, and talking about them? Would you make a good zookeeper? Guest Host Brian Ellison takes a look at the true life of Kansas City Zoo zookeepers on Tuesday's Up to Date. Find out what it's really like to chase a fugitive chimpanzee and keep the penguins healthy and happy in their habitat. Speaking of penguins, you can watch the penguins at the Kansas City Zoo live right here.

Guests:

Mark Fischer / Flickr Creative Commons

Last week we saw the closing of another Supreme Court session with landmark rulings about religious freedom, cell phone privacy, and recess appointments. But there was another decision: a 5-4 ruling that may have an impact on unions and how they operate, including right in the Kansas City area. On Tuesday's Up To Date,  guest host Brian Ellison talks with the AFL-CIO's Craig Becker on the highest court in the land's ruling on union agency fees.

Centers for Disease Control

There are 76 million Americans who were born between the mid-40s and the mid-60s. The Baby Boomers have much of the wealth, much of the power, much of the responsibility in our nation today. But, they also now have the highest suicide rate among all age groups. Guest host Brian Ellison talks with Kansas City Star reporter Rick Montgomery about this alarming statistic and how the rate in Kansas has skyrocketed in the last few years.

Mlaaker / Flickr-CC

When you think of the Masons, images of secret societies and rituals may come to mind—but what about their architecture?

KC Riverfest

Have a star-spangled weekend with this sizzling list of area entertainment from Brian McTavish!

Big Bang: Jackson County’s Fourth of July Celebration
5:30 p.m. (gates open) Friday; free admission
Longview Lake, Shelter #13

KC Riverfest: Music and Fireworks
4 p.m. (gates open) Friday; $5 admission after 5 p.m.
Berkley Riverfront Park

Snowpiecer

  Up to Date's independent, foreign and documentary film critics share their favorites showing on area screens:

Steve Walker:

Cynthia Haines:

  • Ida
  • A Hard Days Night
  • Chef
National Museum of American History

Kansas Citians - or at least Chiefs fans - may have our own take on the closing line of the national anthem, but this Independence Day we can join the rest of America to celebrate the song's 200th anniversary. That's right: it's been two centuries since Francis Scott Key first commemorated the symbol of the home of the brave

Matt Herron

Thursday's Up to Date brings the never before told story of powerful events witnessed by five young photographers during the momentous summer of 1964 in the segregated South. Guest host Brian Ellison talks with Matt Herron, one of the photographers and author of Mississippi Eyes: The Story and Photography of the Southern Documentary Project, "the only book to provide a firsthand account of what it was actually like to photograph the civil rights struggle in the Deep South."

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