Hannah Copeland

Announcer/Contributor

Hannah is an announcer and contributor to KCUR’s arts desk.

She graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City degrees in Business Entrepreneurship and Communication Studies.

Hannah got her start at KCUR through internships with Up to Date in 2014 and the Arts Desk in 2015.

Hannah has played in various bands since 2006 and owned and operated a non-profit music venue in Kirksville, Missouri. She continues to look for productive ways to channel her passion for performance art and pretty much anything involving microphones.

Ways to Connect

Hannah Copeland / KCUR

About 7,000 volunteers and patrons traveled to a pasture on Saturday, June 11, near Cottonwood Falls, Kansas to listen to the Kansas City Symphony perform at the 11th annual Symphony in the Flint Hills.

As the sun began to set Saturday evening the crowd's attention was diverted to the co-stars of the outdoor concert: cows. Volunteer ranchers on horseback herded brown, white and black cattle across the bright green grassy hill behind the Symphony stage.

We're only about half way through 2016, but Kansas City artists haven't been wasting any time. That means area music lovers have had plenty to see and hear.

KCUR's Up To Date continues its tradition of reviewing new local music with area music critics. This time, our panel is:

Courtesy North Kansas City Schools

North Kansas City Schools Board of Education will ask voters in August to approve a $114 million bond issue to improve overcrowded and aging schools.

If approved, rates for taxpayers will remain the same, and North Kansas City Schools will construct two new elementary schools and renovate the 90-year-old North Kansas City High School. 

The district is one of the largest in the metro with nearly 20,000 students.

Courtesy of jocogov.org

Most departments in Johnson County, Kansas, will no longer ask questions about criminal convictions on their job applications. The move is in support of the Fair Chance Hiring initiative, a campaign started by the National Employment Labor Project to give people with criminal records better access to jobs.

Brian Rogers

Story of a Song is a monthly segment on KCUR's Central Standard, in which local musicians tell the story behind a recent song, and explain how it was constructed musically.

The Musicians: Emcee Morgan Cooper (aka Barrel Maker) and producer Brian Rogers (aka Lion)

Hannah Copeland / KCUR 89.3

The second Tuesday in April each year has been designated as Fountain Day — the day Kansas City fountains spring back to life. This year, the festivities included one fountain that had been dry for the last four years.

A crowd cheered as water cascaded down the 28-foot wall and steps of the William Volker Memorial Fountain in Theis Park, just south of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Tax Waver

Apr 13, 2016

You've seen them on the sidewalk outside those tax places, waving to all who pass by. Meet the man behind the Statue of Liberty costume.

Courtesy of Diallo Javonne French

Matt Otto
"Soliloquy" (Jazz Collective Records)

Matt Otto doesn’t resemble an agent of subversion.  Yet the mild-mannered man has instigated a quiet revolution on Kansas City’s jazz scene since he moved to the area in 2009.

Brodie Rush

Be/Non
Mystic Sunrise / Sunset Magic (Haymaker)

Seven men are trapped on the moon. Only a song played well enough to please their alien captors will save them from eternal banishment from Earth. Some plead for a ride home with "oohs" and "aahs"; others beat drums, press keys and turn knobs in perfect unison. With “Aahs Come from the Skies/Oohs Come from the Ground,” Be/Non makes such an unlikely scenario sound possible.

Courtesy Logan Richardson

Logan Richardson
Shift (Blue Note)

The booklet that accompanies Logan Richardson’s monumental new album Shift contains four pages of manga-style graphic art. One panel depicts the saxophonist as a child standing on the corner of 18th & Vine in Kansas City’s Jazz District. He soon encounters Ahmad Alaadeen, an area jazz hero who is shown in the miniature comic book diligently tutoring his promising young disciple.

Hannah Copeland / KCUR 89.3

The largest Folk Music Conference in the world, Folk Alliance International, brought more than 1,000 musicians to Crown Center in Kansas City last week. Musicians and fans crowded into hotel rooms to play and watch hundreds of small concerts hosted during the five day event.

Here are the sounds from those concerts, including a tuba player practicing by a waterfall, and a room organizer stashing his guitar and beer in a bathtub.

We share tips on starting a successful podcast from The Heart's Kaitlin Prest. Our critics on what they're listening to, from fresh takes on folk tales to new ways of exploring crime to voices of Bernie Sanders supporters and other political podcasts.

Courtesy Rebekah Winegarner

After seven hours of sitting at a computer creating a submission for Roland’s Digital Piano Design Contest, Rebekah Winegarner needed some fun. Clicking through the material menu on her industrial design software, she changed her wooden piano, shaped like a rock formation from the Utah desert, to the color of beer.

Courtesy Little Class Records

Julian Davis
Who Walks In, When I Walk Out? (Little Class Records)

With the first listen to Who Walks In, When I Walk Out? any roots fan is going to ask, “How old is this guy again?” The question’s inevitable.

It’s also unfair. (He’s sixteen.) Julian Davis would be a wonderful discovery even if he were as old as Grandma Moses.

Hannah Copeland / KCUR 89.3

Thirty-five local playwrights will capture the mood of Kansas City's present and future at the city's first One-Minute Play Festival this weekend on City Stage at Union Station.

Founded in New York by producing artistic director Dominic D'Andrea, one-minute play festivals have spread all over the country, "with the goal of promoting the spirit of radical inclusion by representing local cultures of playwrights of different age, gender, race, cultures, and points of career," according to the festival's website.

Crystal Lee Farris

Your Friend
Gumption (Domino)

Imagine slowly submerging into a muddy Midwestern lake. Rays of light pierce the surface, illuminating bubbles and small creatures. But it’s hard to tell what’s going on as you sink deeper, losing a sense of how far you are from the surface. Lawrence, Kansas, artist Taryn Miller, who plays under the moniker Your Friend, imposes this sense of disorientation in her debut album Gumption.

Hannah Copeland / KCUR 89.3

There is a little enclave at the RecordBar called "the snug." It's not much bigger than a bathroom. It’s often mistaken for V.I.P. seating. But it’s actually more like V.I.F. seating: Very Important Family. On Saturday night, Sondra Freeman was there, dabbing her eyes with a square white cloth, while the band Your Friend performed behind her on stage.

“What I’m going to miss the most about the RecordBar is that the napkins absorb tears really well,” Freeman said.

Courtesy Photo / The Electric Lungs

The Electric Lungs
Don’t Be Ashamed of the Way You Were Made

A lot of churches today have a clashing musical lineup: electric-guitar-and-drums rock songs for the Lord’s newbies, and a smattering of organ and upright piano standards to please the old folks.

The Best Kansas City Music Of 2015

Dec 18, 2015

It's becoming a year-end tradition at KCUR's Up to Date: Reviewing the year's best work from area musicians.

This year's panelists are:

Joe Stanziola

Second Hand King
Before the Bomb Drops

In a 30-second slice from Before the Bomb Drops' opener, Second Hand King (Joe Stanziola) reminds us to “be glad [we’re] not in Baghdad,” plays a radio sample about the atomic bomb, and regrets drunkenly texting a girl he doesn’t care about. This enigmatic album gives Stanziola a platform to think through his own problems while telling the audience not to think so hard, because “nothing really matters.”

courtesy: Empty Bowls KC

One man has been driving all over Kansas City for eight months transporting hundreds of fragile handmade bowls.

 

“I show up with newspaper and a mish-mash of boxes that I’ve grabbed. Right now, I’ve probably got four or five boxes [of bowls] and before the end of the day I will have a few more,” says ceramic artist LeRoy Grubbs.

Local musicians tell the story behind a recent song and explain how it was constructed musically in The Story of a Song, a monthly segment from  KCUR's Central Standard.

Artist: HMPH!

The Song: Sghetti Sauce

Courtesy HMPH!

HMPH!
Headrush (Haymaker Records)

Hearing the instrumental math rock HMPH! is like watching a mastermind play an intense game of Tetris. Like blocks, notes keep coming with no indication of where they will fall, making the band’s debut album, Headrush, an unpredictable journey.

Marina Chavez

Danielle Nicole
Wolf Den (Concord Music Group)

If the blues were an amputated, gushing heart, Danielle Nicole (Schnebelen) would gladly pick it up and pin it to her sleeve for the sake of a song.

After the Schnebelen family band, Trampled Under Foot, parted ways last year, Nicole wasted no time in creating the Danielle Nicole Band. Wolf Den, her debut solo album, hemorrhages tales of pain and vulnerability from the daily trouble of finding a love that lasts.

Hannah Copeland / KCUR

Bassist Johnny Hamil started out playing what he calls "sleaze-rock." Now, he performs and teaches in many musical languages, and he's trying to teach classically trained young musicians to shred with all-string arrangements of songs by AC/DC and the Ramones. 

Guest:

Fally Afani / iheartlocalmusic.com

Bummer
Spank (High Dive Records)

On first listen, it’s easy to dismiss Spank, the new EP by the Olathe, Kansas three-piece appropriately named Bummer, as a generic angry punk record. But as of the second listen, it’s more than just raging noise.

Deadly themes rise out of dismal drones and pounding thuds fill this 20 minutes of what the band describes as "Neanderthal rock," which ends in a fiery feedback fuzzblanket that might unleash repressed tears or a fit of cathartic wall-punching.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

In March, for the first time, the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival staged a production not at Southmoreland Park in Midtown Kansas City, Missouri, but indoors, at Johnson County Community College’s Polsky Theatre.

Working without having to worry about rain, bugs, and people walking their dogs made the festival’s typical technical challenges a breeze, says executive artistic director Sidonie Garrett.

Courtesy Nuwayv

Earlier this year when the Folk Alliance International conference was underway in Kansas City, Central Standard interviewed local musicians from different genres about how they write songs. That inspired us to launch a new series: "Story of a Song."

For this installment, Hannah Copeland spoke with members of the Kansas City band, Nuwayv, which defines its music as "rugged soul." Hannah explains how the four artists collaborated to write their new album’s final track, “We Shinin.”

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