Elle Moxley

General Assignment Reporter

Elle joined KCUR in 2014 as a general assignment reporter. Most recently, she covered Indiana schools as an education reporter for NPR’s StateImpact project.

Previously, she reported for The Examiner in Independence, Mo., and KBIA-FM in Columbia, Mo.

She is a graduate of the University of Missouri.

Ways To Connect

Elle Moxley / KCUR

When Corinne Corley, 60, moved to Brookside two decades ago, her morning Kansas City Star came around 5:30.

“Now, it comes between 6:30 and 7,” says Corley, clutching her cup of coffee as she reads the headlines on her tablet. She has a digital subscription to the New York Times, but she still gets the Star delivered to her door.

“There’s just something about the feel of a newspaper in your hand,” she says.

Her paper arrives with a thud around 6:25 a.m. Corley waves to her carrier.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

As Mosby, Missouri, Police Sgt. Jason Lininger helped residents evacuate their Clay County homes Sunday morning, he asked Fishing River Fire how fast the water was rising.

"At one point, it actually rose four foot in one hour," Lininger told Gov. Jay Nixon during a briefing Monday afternoon.

Severe weather this weekend spawned 10 confirmed in Bates, Henry, Caldwell, Jackson, Ray, Newton, Lawrence and Polk counties. An unconfirmed tornado near Bethany leveled several grain elevators.

But the real problem was flash flooding.

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

A Johnson County judge agreed Thursday to let accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. represent himself in court, a decision that could have far-reaching implications as the state pursues its capital case.

Cross, a known anti-Semite who has bragged to the media about killing three people last spring at two Overland Park Jewish sites, has repeatedly told Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan he doesn't trust his lawyers and wants them fired.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Ask WABE education reporter Martha Dalton about the school district she covers, and you might think she’s talking about Kansas City.

“In 2012, they were put on probation by their accrediting agency. They had a lot of problems with their board, their board was having a lot of governance issues, their accreditors stepped in and said, ‘This has got to change,’” says Dalton.

If what Dalton's saying sounds familiar, it's because Kansas City Public Schools also lost accreditation in 2012.

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Update, 11:16 a.m.:

After a weighty silence, a Johnson County District Court judge agreed to let accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. defend himself. 

His attorneys - Martin Warhurst, Mark Manna and Jeffrey Dazey - will stay on as "standby counsel" in what may be the first capital case in Kansas where the defendant represents himself. 

"Do you understand, sir, at trial, you're going to be held to the same standard as an attorney?" Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan asked Cross. 

Kansas City Public Schools

Updated, 7:20 p.m.:

It's official: Kansas City Public Schools Superintendent R. Stephen Green is leaving the district to take another position in Georgia. 

Green has been a stabilizing influence in the district in the years since it lost state accreditation in 2012. But he says he's not worried his departure will stall efforts to regain full accreditation.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

A state match of $7.4 million dollars will help build the Robert W. Plaster Free Enterprise Center at the the University of Missouri-Kansas City's Volker campus.

"Just last week the state budget office announced we have a revenue increase of 7.7 percent compared to last year," Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said at a press conference announcing the match. "That's an increase that's well above revised projections. Hence, I am here to spend some."

Elle Moxley / KCUR

The American Nurses Association, the National Society of Black Engineers, SkillsUSA – all groups Kansas City, Missouri, Mayor Sly James says would have held conventions in the metro if not for a lack of hotel space.

"They love Kansas City," James says. "They were going to look out at the hotels, and when they came back, they said, 'We can't come.'"

James and other civic leaders hope to remedy the problem with a new, $300 million hotel across the street from the Kansas City Convention Center. 

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Jackson County officials thanked each other Thursday for the successful completion of a project to house Kansas City Police Department detainees on the ground floor of the county detention center.

County Executive Mike Sanders estimates the city will save up to $1 million annually using the Jackson County Detention Center rather than police headquarters to house detainees. The old detention center was in need of costly renovations to comply with American with Disabilities Act accessibility standards.

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Lawyers for accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. want the state to strike evidence found in his car and suppress the statements of four witnesses who say they saw him carry out the attacks on April 13, 2014.

Though Cross, a known anti-Semite who also goes by Frazier Glenn Miller, has boasted in interviews he committed the murders at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom, the motions his lawyers filed last week indicate they'll mount an aggressive defense.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon had harsh words for lawmakers who want to enact lifetime limits on the state's Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

Speaking at Operation Breakthrough in Kansas City, Missouri, Thursday morning, Nixon called Senate Bill 24 "a misguided measure that punishes poor children in the legislature's zeal to reduce reliance on government assistance."

Lawmakers want to cap TANF benefits at 45 months. Currently, families are eligible for five years of benefits.

The departure of Bishop Robert Finn won’t stall the Kansas City-St. Joseph Diocese’s plan to open a new high school in Lee’s Summit, Missouri, next fall.

St. Michael the Archangel High School is expected to open in fall 2016 with about 360 students, mostly students from St. Mary's in Independence, Missouri, which closed last year, and Archbishop O'Hara High School, which will close when the new school opens.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Updated, 9:30 a.m. Friday: Johnson County law enforcement officials arrested one of two people they were seeking in a fraudulent driver's license ring Thursday night.

Earlier Thursday, District Attorney Stephen Howe asked for the public's help in locating Monica Hernandez-Gonzalez, 44. He described Hernandez-Gonzalez as a "fixer" who helped connect undocumented workers with a former driver's licenses examiner making false documents.

So far, 40 people have been arrested in the scheme.

The original post continues below.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

An updated computer lab at the Mattie Rhodes Center in the Historic Northeast will help Kansas City's Latino community access the technology they need for work and school.

The League of United Latin America Citizens, or LULAC, runs the Empower Hispanic America technology center housed at Mattie Rhodes, 148 N. Topping Ave, Kansas City, Missouri. AT&T donated $200,000 to LULAC to update seven of its community technology centers.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Mindy Corporon and her husband, Len Losen, watched as thousands of people began a walk from the Jewish Community Center to the Church of the Resurrection in Overland Park, Kansas, Monday night.

It's been a year since Reat Underwood, 14; William Corporon, 69; and Terri LaManno, 53; died in the shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom. 

And tomorrow, Corporon will look onward, the theme for the walk and the last of the SevenDays events planned in honor of her late son and father.

But not yet. Not tonight.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

The vast majority of seniors – nearly 90 percent, according to a 2011 AARP study – want to stay in the homes and communities where they've always lived.

Ellen Becky Grossman is no exception. The 101-year-old Roeland Park resident has never wanted to live anywhere but the home she built with her late husband in 1948.

But like a lot of Kansas City homes of a certain age, Grossman's single-story ranch house wasn't ideal for aging in place. That's why she enlisted the help of David Groves, one of a growing number of contractors who specialize in aging in place renovations.

“You might see his work right at the front door,” Grossman says.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

The Missouri House will take up another body camera proposal next week.

Lawmakers have filed nine different bills looking at how law enforcement officers record their interactions with the public. Proponents of police body cameras say they can provide crucial evidence in cases like the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, last year.

Blue Springs Rep. Sheila Solon says the legislation that passed out of the Select Committee on State and Local Governments would protect the privacy of people recorded.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt emphasized the need for Congress to pass a five- or six-year highway bill during a stop in Blue Springs, Missouri, Friday morning.

The Highway Trust Fund is set to expire next month after being propped up for years with stopgap legislation.

"You can't build roads and bridges six months at a time," Blunt told civic leaders at a Blue Springs Chamber of Commerce breakfast. "You can't get the best bid, you can't get the work done, you can't do anything you need to do there six months or even two years at a time."

Elle Moxley / KCUR

It's a common problem for mail order pharmacies such as Overland Park-based OptumRX – patients will return prescription drugs, unopened.

"Let's say when their physician changed their prescription, they forgot to to notify us that the original cycle of medications they were on needed to change," says Tim Wicks, CEO of OptumRX.

Usually, those returned prescriptions end up in the trash.

Photo courtesy Mindy Corporon


It's been almost a year since three people were gunned down outside the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom in Overland Park, Kansas. The avowed anti-Semite accused of killing William Corporon, 69; Reat Underwood, 14; and Terri LaManno, 53; on April 13, 2014, will face capital murder charges at a trial this summer.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The iconic J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain on the Country Club Plaza will soon be bubbling again.

The fountain underwent extensive repairs this winter, paid for by $250,000 in private donations.

Workers installed the bronze statues Wednesday, and Kansas City Redditors shared photos of the four horsemen on their way across the metro.

Next week, workers will test the fountain to make sure the plumbing has been installed correctly. It's expected to reopen April 14 for Fountain Day.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Kansas City Mayor Sly James used his State of the City address Tuesday to outline his priorities for a probable second term, which include reducing crime, improving education and revitalizing the urban core.

He says Kansas City must begin budgeting for costly infrastructure improvements that have been ignored for too long.

"We have a backlog of deferred maintenance, and my priority is to deal with it," James said Tuesday in his speech at Starlight.

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Update, 5:35 p.m.:

Attorneys representing the man accused of killing three people outside two Overland Park, Kansas, Jewish sites last year told a Johnson County judge Friday they'll need more than 150 days to prepare his defense.

But Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. disagreed, arguing he'd stand trial in 30 days if Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan would allow it.

"I asked about a speedy trial months ago," Cross complained to Ryan.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Dr. Joseph Waeckerle says he's always been interested in sports medicine because athletes are usually highly motivated to get better and get back on the field.

Put simply, they're better patients.

But now doctors know more about concussions than they did when Waeckerle, a longtime Kansas City physician, studied sports medicine in the 1970s. 

Transit advocate Clay Chastain, left, Mayor Sly James, and Vincent 'The General' Lee take questions at a League of Women Voters mayoral candidate forum.
Elle Moxley / KCUR

All three candidates in the race for Kansas City, Mo., mayor answered questions at a League of Women Voters forum Tuesday Night.

Mayor Sly James will face challengers Clay Chastain and Vincent Lee in the primary April 7. 

James has more than $400,000 in campaign contributions on hand, a virtually limitless war chest when Chastain and Lee only reported "limited activity" to the Missouri Ethics Commission, which by law indicates less than $500 in spending.

Chastain's name will be familiar to voters because of his failed light rail initiatives, including one last summer he contends James and others in City Hall effectively killed when they required a change in ballot language.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Six people face federal money laundering charges in an alleged $13 million scheme that allowed Kansas contractors to pay undocumented workers in cash.

U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom announced the charges Thursday at the federal courthouse in Kansas City, Kan. Grissom said that instead of raiding factories looking for undocumented workers, his office is trying to target the root cause of illegal immigration.

"We've thought that there has to be a better, more humane and from the taxpayer's standpoint, a more effective way to address this problem," Grissom said.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

When it comes to delivering meals to seniors, Don Davis is an old pro. 

“Every once in awhile they miss one, and it’s easier to count them ahead of time and not be short,” he says, sifting through two big cooler bags of food outside the Matt Ross Community Center in Overland Park.

Once he's sure the number of meals is right, he hoists them into the trunk and tells wife, Toni, it's time to hit the road. It’s about 10:30 a.m. when the couple begins their regular Friday route for Johnson County Meals on Wheels.

A shortage of beds for Missouri inmates means a West Bottoms center for parolees and probationers will go back to being a minimum security prison.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

In Indiana, low-income people can open health savings accounts.

Utah lawmakers are building work participation and co-pays into their Medicaid overhaul.

Iowa will charge a monthly premium – and crack down on the costly practice of using emergency rooms for non-emergency care.

But as other deep-red states agree to expand Medicaid within their borders, Gov. Jay Nixon says Missouri is leaving federal health care dollars on the table.

A federal appeals court panel on Monday struck down part of a Missouri law that prohibits "profane discourse" outside of churches and other houses of worship.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri filed the challenge to the 2012 Missouri House of Worship Protection Act on behalf of SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. The group regularly hands out pamphlets outside churches urging parishioners to beware of abusive clergy members.

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