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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

The Latest In Sports

59 minutes ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

How We Got Here: Treating Addiction In 28 Days

59 minutes ago

Louis Casanova is playing cards with a friend on the back deck of a recovery house in Philadelphia's northern suburbs.

He's warm and open as he talks about his past few years. The guy everyone calls Louie started using drugs like Xanax and Valium during his freshman year of high school. At age 18, Casanova turned to heroin. About two years later, the rehab shuffle began.

"I relapsed and then I was just getting high. And then I went to treatment again in February of 2015," he says. "Then I relapsed again and went back to treatment."

Michael Twitty wants you to know where Southern food really comes from. And he wants the enslaved African-Americans who were part of its creation to get credit. That's why Twitty goes to places like Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's grand estate in Charlottesville, Va. — to cook meals that slaves would have eaten and put their stories back into American history.

It's October now, a month known for apple cider, colorful leaves — and hideous stock-price plunges.

This is the month that brought Americans such horrors as: The Panic of 1907; The Crash of 1929; The Black Monday of 1987; The Asia Market Crash of 1997 and The Financial Crisis of 2008 when the Dow Jones industrial average plunged.

So yes, October, you have a terrible reputation, and we are wary. Especially in this presidential election year — with so much political anger and uncertainty swirling — retirement savers may be wondering: Will you bring us another nightmare?

Just after dawn one morning last month, Peace Corps volunteer Sarah D'Antoni stood on the banks of Lake Issyk Kul, raised her arms in the air and then jumped into the chilly water.

The wind was whipping. The waves were pounding. There was lightning off in the distance. But a little bad weather wasn't going to stop the 24-year-old from swimming the 8.3 miles — to the opposite side of Kyrgyzstan's largest lake. Four hours and 43 minutes later, she arrived with a message she wanted to share.

If Donald Trump dredges up former President Bill Clinton's history of extramarital affairs to use it against his Democratic rival, it could be a risky move the GOP nominee amid the new storm he stoked over his own comments about and treatment of women.

Visiting a museum full of airplanes and rocket ships is a pretty awesome field trip. Now imagine camping out for a whole night in Smithsonian's huge hangar outside Washington D.C. You're there with a few other lucky kids, some grownups, and aviation treasures like the space shuttle Discovery.

Hurricane Matthew is roaring across the Caribbean Sea as a monster Category 5 storm on a course that puts Jamaica, as well as parts of Haiti and Cuba, in the path of its potentially devastating winds and rain.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center called it the strongest Atlantic hurricane since Felix in 2007, and said Matthew will be approaching Jamaica late Sunday night. It is expected to reach the eastern part of the island on Monday.

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump released their medical records earlier this month, and now it's Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson's turn to boast that he is "extremely physically fit."

The letter from the former New Mexico governor's physician, Dr. Lyle B. Amer of Santa Fe, explains that the 63-year-old Johnson's "decades of dedication to physical fitness, diet, no drinking, and no smoking have paid dividends as far as his current extraordinarily good health at this time of his life." (We'll come back to that smoking line).

It's one of the most famous delis in the U.S., if not the world; its food has been called "nearly orgasmic" — but now comes word that New York's famed Carnegie Delicatessen will be closing its doors at the end of 2016.

On Friday, New Orleans received new flood maps from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Overnight, more than half the population moved out of the so-called high-risk zone.

But with half the city at or below sea level and memories of massive flooding after Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago, some residents are worried these new maps send the wrong message.

The United States owes African Americans reparations for its history of “racial terrorism,” according to a new report from a United Nations working group based in Geneva.

The team was invited by the U.S. government to conduct a fact-finding mission that explored the many ways in which racial discrimination has taken form, including police violence, mass incarceration and housing segregation; it also looks back in detail at slavery and the brutal practice of lynching.

Ash Vs. Evil Dead,” the television spin-off of the cult classic 1980s films, makes its return to Starz for season two on Sunday.

Bruce Campbell plays Ash Williams, a comical-yet-flawed character who returns to his hometown to fight evil. The series includes violent scenes that have no shortage of blood and gore for viewers, but how far is too far?

NPR’s Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the series’s return.

Uber is expanding its food delivery service, UberEats, planning to expand to at least 22 more countries in the next few months.

The delivery service launched in London and a few U.S. cities in the spring and summer, and this week began operating in Amsterdam, Dubai, Johannesburg and Tokyo. UberEats plans to be up and running in Stockholm, Jakarta, Bangkok and other cities within months.

Texas has announced that it is withdrawing from the federal Refugee Resettlement Program, citing security concerns.

Gov. Greg Abbott's announcement means that "refugees will continue to come to Texas, albeit without the state acting as the middleman between federal dollars and local resettlement agencies," according to the Austin American-Statesman.

This is a big weekend for matzo ball soup.

Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, starts Sunday night, and chef Pati Jinich wants all the matzo-ball makers out there to understand: The soup doesn't care whether you prefer floaters or sinkers.

"It turns out that matzo balls are insanely capricious," Jinich says. "One Friday, they're like, you can have me fluffy. And the other week is like, this is what you'll get."

"I am thirsty," the river complains, "from quenching your thirst. I am tired from the turns along the way."

That's what the 475-mile Cauvery River in India says in a song called "Pyaasi' (the Hindi feminine adjective for 'thirsty'). A young musician wrote the song during a drought in 2009, when the two states through which the river flows were arguing over rights to its water.

Samsung is facing another big problem with one of its products — reports of exploding top-loading washing machines.

The timing likely couldn't be less serendipitous. Earlier this month, Samsung recalled its new Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after dozens of users reported that the batteries exploded or caught fire.

This week, the Code Switch team tackled this question: What do you do when a friend, loved one or stranger makes a comment that falls somewhere on the racism spectrum? On the blog and on the podcast, we and friends of Code Switch shared stories about those uncomfortable moments and how we reacted.

In the TV comedy version of Portland, Ore., the bookstore is called Women and Women First. In real life, it's In Other Words — and the shop is using frank terms to say the Portlandia show is no longer welcome to film there. The feminist store and community center faults the show's depiction of men dressing as women, its treatment of store staff, and its role in gentrification and race relations.

Men who may have been exposed to the Zika virus should wait at least six months before trying to conceive a child with a partner, regardless of whether they ever had any symptoms, federal health officials are recommending.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had previously recommended that only men with Zika symptoms had to wait that long. Those who may have been exposed to Zika but never developed any symptoms were told to hold off on trying to conceive for just eight weeks.

Saying that Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore violated judicial ethics when he ordered judges not to respect the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, Alabama's Court of the Judiciary suspended Moore for the rest of his term in office.

Zika wasn't even on Dr. Sankar Swaminathan's mind when he first examined a severely ill 73-year-old man in a Salt Lake City hospital in June. The patient had just returned from a visit to Mexico when he suddenly fell violently ill.

"We were not thinking about Zika at all because Zika usually does not cause severe illness, in fact it almost never does," says Swaminathan, chief of the division of infectious diseases at the University of Utah.

When people go to the dentist, they generally expect to leave in better health than when they walked in.

But the water dentists use to rinse teeth sometimes carries infectious bacteria.

The Orange County Health Care Agency in California says that nearly two dozen children who received so-called baby root canals, or pulpotomies, are thought to have developed dangerous bacterial infections. Dentists perform pulpotomies to remove infected pulp inside a baby tooth so the rest of the tooth can be spared.

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